Wednesday, November 09, 2011

Sunflower Field Yarn-Bombing + Craft Activism Book Giveaway

Our sunflower field was a bit of a bust this year. The weather didn't cooperate too well and we just got too busy to make it look as good as it usually does. I did what I could and crossed my fingers. Lo and behold, we had lots and lots of blooms - not enough to sell at our our roadside stand - bit enough for me to make many gorgeous photos and bouquets for the house for my summer classes. I never even got a chance to put them on the blog. So here is a particularly beautiful shot of a single sunflower. By single, I mean that with each seed, you get one stem with a largish sunflower at the top. These are the kinds of sunflowers that are grown in greenhouses and that you find in the grocery store.


This is one of my favorite varieties. It is called The Joker and the seed is hard to find. Johnny's stopped carrying it and I have no idea where I ever found it.


 I like it because each plant yields at least 20 flowers and they come in many different patterns. Some all yellow, some yellow and henna, some darker rust. Each of the flowers usually has a little frill around the center of the flower.


As the season was waning, I got a little sad about what could have been. That's the way it is with gardening and farming - you live for the possibilities of next year, what you are going to do better, what you are going to let go, and you think about how the heck you can fit it all in with only the daylight hours and all your other responsibilities in your life. We all know how that can change depending on the people in your life and what they need from you, never mind what you really do to make money to feed your family. 

As Sunflower Season was winding down, I came up with one of those "brilliant ideas" - you know, you're driving around in the car, letting your mind wander, thinking of new things to make, bake, cook, visit, do better, or just plain stop doing. I thought about our sunflowers - I think about them a lot in the summer. But summer was turning to autumn and my mind always wanders towards knitting and designing in autumn - when things stop growing outside and I have to make things grow in the house. It's basically a move that I make creatively - from outdoors creativity to indoors creativity.

This was just about the time that I heard about Joan Tapper and Gale Zucker's new book CraftActivism. The thought of the knitters all over the world "yarn bombing" places in their communities was just so much fun. Fiberart and knitting reaching the masses is very cool. But then, where I live, there aren't that many people. But on my blog and website, I do reach the masses - like you all who are reading today. That's when it struck me. I will yarn-bomb our sunflower field - just as the blooms are dying away.

I started knitting and knitting. I didn't stop - for fear of frost. I had to get this job done quickly.

Today, I would like to present to you all my own little bit of yarn-bombing country style. My version of The Joker.


A single handknit and felted Autumn Beauty.....


A branching sunflower full of knitted, felted, and embroidered blossoms.


Pattern for these coming soon.

BUT here's the good news. I have a giveaway for you today.... one copy of Gale Zucker and Joan Tapper's new book CraftActivism donated by their publisher Potter Craft. Their book's blog is here.


Here's how to enter......
Answer this question in the comments: Tell me what you think of yarn bombing.... Have you ever done it? Has it happened in your town? What kind of "craft activism" do you do? (Making things for charities counts). Or do you just think it is plain silly?

Contest ends at Sunday November 13th at 11:59 p.m. Please leave an easy way to get a hold of you!

p.s. Just found this bit of yarn-bombing in the form of handknit scarves left for anyone who wants or needs one in Easton, PA. Knit on all you "Chase the Chill" knitters!

75 comments:

Bonney said...

I love the idea of yarn bombing. I did a small stretch of road in our rural town not knowing what to expect. I never heard a word about it! Nobody touched it but a squirrel tried to chew one of the pieces off a tree - I think he probably knew what a cozy winter he'd have if he could get it. It's still there 2 years later although it looks a little bit sad now. Maybe it's time for a refresh?

Beth said...

I've never seen yarn bombing except in photos but I love some of the creative ideas and fun of taking knitting out into public spaces. A group of friends are hoping to start making some blankets and quilts for a special needs nursery at an orphanage in China where another friend of our's works. I'd love to read the book!

Sally said...

Okay, first of all, Kristin, your sunflowers......I'm SPEECHLESS! I could weep! So darn beautiful. Second, love the book; bought it for the library and for my daughter for Christmas (would love a copy just for moi). Yarn bombing: my library knitting group yarn bombed our staff garden to coincide with a city-wide outdoor art exhibit. See "Spring Riot" on my ravelry page (seedesigns). More craft activism: with another, now defunct, knitting group, I designed a BIG banner (meant to be carried waist-high by two to three people)to take to peace rallies, Code Pink events, etc. Each member knit a letter according to a chart I gave them with whatever they had in their scrap basket. See Knit Peace banner on my Rav page. I also knit some peace sign armbands (also on my page) etc. etc. I LOVE craft activism! It's a beautiful, often functional way to express or do something important. Plus, I truly believe in the power of the prayers/vibes that go into each stitch for whatever/whomever the cause! Great post, Kristin!

mary kate witry said...

I was at University of Illinois for the state Science Fair and there were all of these lovely, varied knitted squares attaached to a cyclone construction fence.
My sons yelled "look Mom, knitting!" (I have trained them well...)
I liked the unexpected joy of the handmade in the center of the rather depressed city.
Mary Kate Witry
pwitry@rcn.com

LindaM said...

I love yarn bombing, and get very excited when I see it around town. I have not done it myself, although I plan to 'bomb' my mailbox and mailbox post with granny squares, (from your "Knit & Crochet Today" episode), even thought I'm a knitter, now that the weather has cooled off!
LindaM
ibdmom AT me.com

LeslieB said...

I love the idea of yarn bombing! I use all my extra skeins to knit scarves or hats and take them to the local GoodWill shop.
The book loves amazing. Thanks for the contest.

MicheleinMaine said...

I love what you did to your sunflowers!

As for yarn-bombing - I think it is funny and I support it but I've never done it.

Still, I would love to win a copy of Gale's book! I took a class from her at the Fiber College and it was great!

Whosyergurl said...

OH, Kristen, love the sunflowers and LOVE your knitted sunflowers!
xo, Cheryl

Paula Calestagne said...

I love the idea of yarn bombing but... have never seen it in action live.
Charity knitting has been an activity my family has done for years-- my late aunt used to knit baby layettes for NICU babies going to foster homes , and my mom aunt and I have knit countless premmie hats, blankets and occaisonal special request items (open toe socks, fingerless gloves and knit tubes to cover IV 's for children)
The sunflowers are wonderful !!!

merrilymarylee said...

Years ago I decided to have a first-day-of-spring brunch, even though it was cold, grey, and the ground still had several inches of snow. I thought my cancer-stricken neighbor would be cheered by a reminder that sunshine and warmth were ahead. I "planted" a dead tree limb in the front yard and bedecked it with crocheted flowers from a long-abandoned afghan project. Instant spring! As a child of the south (where dogwoods bloom profusely) I told my Midwestern friends this was a Tackywood Tree. You can imagine why I'm so awed by your sunflowers! WOW!

The first lacy scarf I ever had the nerve to try (and it turned on to be a success!) was a scarf from Joan Tapper's SHEAR SPIRIT book. I'd love to win this one!

merrilymarylee@gmail.com

Paula said...

I love the idea of yarn bombing but... have never seen it in action live.
Charity knitting has been an activity my family has done for years-- my late aunt used to knit baby layettes for NICU babies going to foster homes , and my mom aunt and I have knit countless premmie hats, blankets and occaisonal special request items (open toe socks, fingerless gloves and knit tubes to cover IV 's for children)
The sunflowers are wonderful !!!

p_calestagne@hotmailDOTcom

Bonnie said...

I haven't yarn bombed, but I love looking at pictures of it. I feel like knitting takes so much time that I'd rather be knitting for charity or loved ones than to yarn bomb. I don't think it's silly at all--just not something I'm drawn to do. I do like to do charity knitting, mostly hats for newborns. I have this book on my request list from the library and would love to own a copy!

Francie said...

Love, love, love your sunflower yarn bombing!!!

I love the idea of yarn bombing but have never seen it myself.

I love knitting for others (prayer shawls, etc.) and recycling.

Would love a copy of Craft Activism.

Check out this link I followed from the Knitty blog (http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/business/2011/10/27/calling-all-shepherds.html). It reminded me of you and your new pups.

lorraine said...

i love yarn bombing but ive never tried it..i havent seen anyone do it in my town but maybe i should try it :) awesome looking book! raineoc@yahoo.com

dianenorth said...

Your real and handmade sunflowers are so beautiful..my husband has it on his bucket list to see a field of sunflowers some day (tough in Florida!). I love the yarn bombing I have seen on blogs (especially the water tower and bus!)..I do have the perfect telephone pole right in front of my house beckoning me..I am involved in knitting prayer shawls for the caring ministry at our church, I have been good so far and not kept a single one!

laurie said...

We yarn bomb at LYS. The strip mall owner is all for it. And the local pizza shop we knitter go to has been bombed. Your sunflowers are wonderful. Sure would like to win the book.
thanks for your blogging.

North Pines GS said...

I have not yet done any yarn bombing but I think it is in my future. There have been a couple in my area and I admire it when I read of it or see it. I have done a bit of knitting for charities such as our local LYS Mitten Fairy program and Warm Up America. I hope to keep at least one WIP dedicated to charity knitting and recently started a Special Olympics scarf. I love your sunflowers (real and Knitted).

Savannagal said...

I hate to be a stick in the mud, but I personally dislike yarn bombing. I find it a waste of time, money and supplies. All could be put to better use creating chemo hats or any number of other items for charitible purposes, if not for one's own needs. I don't support it and never will. That said, I don't frown upon those who partake in it. It's their right and who am I to judge.

Auntie Shan said...

Kristin, the SUNFLOWERS are Brilliant!! They should make all of the other plants totally jealous!

Despite never seeing it first hand, I do enjoying seeing the pics of it Worldwide. On "some" level, I agree with "SAVANNAGAL" that perhaps all of that Yarn could be put to better use... HOWEVER, if it brings a Smile to Someone's face, the Mental-Health aspects are *just* as important! -- Actually, it all reminds me of the FLOWER-POWER 60s!

As for "doing" it... I have, sorta.. For 2 months over the Summer a Family Member had to undergo daily Rad-Treatment. I would spend my time Crocheting in the rather pleasant soothing-coloured Zen-ish designed Waiting Area, which just screamed for a hit of Colour! I Crocheted up a bunch of "Flags" for CANADA DAY and stuck Them around. The TECHS and Patients loved Them!

So, yeah. I'm HOOKS up on Yarn-Bombing!

SaraGL said...

I think yarn bombing is fabulous! In my experience, it never ceases to elicit smiles. I haven't seen any in my city (San Diego) although there has been some reported, but I have seen light poles in a tunnel in Austin yarn bombed as well as a grove of trees in a business district of San Francisco. As far as personal craft activism goes, I have knit scarves for the Red Scarf Project every year since it was started.
I would love to read more about the connection between crafting and activism in the book.
BTW your sunflowers are fabulous and certainly hold their own in the field. Lovely!

gale (she shoots sheeps shots) said...

Oh Kristin I can't even begin to tell you how much I LOVE these! You know I'm your fan..but in this case, SUPER FAN!

ps thanks for doing teh Craft Activism giveaway!

Anonymous said...

I too love the felted sunflowers.

I am planning to yarn bomb the speed limit sign by my house. I have started knitting a screaming yellow "sock" for the post of the sign. My neighbor's boat used to be at the curb near where the sign stands. Everyone found my corner house by turning just after the boat. He moved the boat so I need another way to describe where my house is located.

I think yarn bombing is quite creative and interesting public art.

In the meantime, I have done charity knitting. I have made scarves for the homeless and baby hats for preemies and a scarf for the Red Scarf project.
Paula F

Suzanne said...

Love the sunflowers, both real and knitted.

I go to a knitting camp every summer and one year a girl knit some noro up and wrapped it around a post. Unfortunately, it was gone the next year.

John Green said...

Beautiful, Thanks for Sharing

Sara said...

Last fall the Madison (WI) Knitters Guild with one of the departments at UW yarn-bombed a bus shelter. We contributed scarves that then found their way to homeless people...we hope anyway. It was fun and funky and I really enjoyed participating!
Your sunflowers, real and knitted, are gorgeous!

Sara (Survivor on Rav)

evie said...

I love those sunflowers, natural and knit! I'm a fan of yarn bombing. I think it's like art. Sure, someone might benefit from a hat or scarf or mittens, but something that grabs people attention and makes them smile is a good use of yarn too. The people I know who yarn bomb also do charity knitting too. I work in Berkeley. CA and we find yarn bombing all over. I especially like the yarn bombed bike racks. See http://www.berkeleyside.com/2011/05/03/eighty-feet-of-knitting-added-to-downtown-bike-racks/

Jo said...

loved the knitted sunflowers! One of the most profound experiences I've had is watching a large field of sunflowers turn.

Okay, yarn bombing! I love it when I see the media coverage. But.....there's so much to knit.....so little time. I personally have recruited lots of new knitters by establishing a knitting group at my church. I try not tobe didactic.....participants can knit for charity or just get help with their current projects. They can be accomplished knitters or total beginners. I try to be supportive and helpful to all of them. Jo

Elaine said...

Your sunflowers are gorgeous!! We do yarn bombing at the Windy City Knitting Guild (over 200 members) for charity every year and knit for several organizations. We knit for all age groups from infants to elders and bring all items to our charity meeting in Sept. when the representatives from the various hospitals, homes and organizations collect them. Such a warm, fuzziness!! I have 2 young trees in front of my house that need to be yarn bombed. This is a winter project for sure to use up all the bits and pieces left from bigger projects.
eblim01@yahoo.com

sheepyhollow said...

I l.o.v.e. the idea of yarn-bombing! I've never done it, but would be great fun to participate. I've often shared my fiber passion with folks in my small town senior center and assisted living org. Also, dyeing w/kool-aid at Spring Wool Shearing at Metro-Park Woolcott Farm Learning Center.

Your sunflowers are wonderful! If I win, my email is grdepa@yahoo.com

Vermont Grand View Farm said...

Our farm, VT Grand View Farm, is all about craft activism!! We participate in the NOFA farm to school pen pal program each year. We exchange letters with a public school classroom year round educating them about sheep farming and fiber crafts. We then bring them to the farm in the spring to get them hooked on everything fiber from sheep to yarn! They learn to card and spin wool, felt, and weave!

mn_bird said...

I really love the felted flowers. They are fabulous. Hurrah! There's going to be another pattern.

I'm not much into yarn bombing. A friend made a scarf for a statute of a steer. The statute was in front of a bar that was 2 doors down from her studio. That was fun. Her husband decided that he liked the colors of the scarf, so she made him a matching one.

Dianna said...

I love the idea of yarn bombing - seeing bridges and buses decked in yarn - but then I think of the "waste" of time and yarn - I really like the idea of bombing with useful items - like the scarves in the project you linked to! Then the time and yarn have been useful as well as decorative (for a while). Love the sunflowers - both yours and God's! much2knit@hotmail.com

Denise P. said...

I had not heard of yarn-bombing until your post. Your sunflowers are amazing!
I think I like the idea.
flgirl1987 AT yahoo DOT com

Suzanne said...

Those sunflowers are just stunning! I am pining for a bit of summer now instead of the recent ice storm we experienced in western MA. I have never heard of yarn-bombing before, my goodness I am in the dark! I have knit for charities and always enjoy that. I guess I will have to go see what yarn bombing is:-)

KnitNana said...

Wow, what to comment on first? I adore those sunflowers!!! And yarn bombing! It's so fun to come upon it. I have a friend here in town who has done a lot of it, my own craft activism is charitable knitting from Knitting Red for Women's Heart Disease, knitting Warm Hats for Hot Heads (political activism), and knitting winter items for those in Vermont devastated by Hurricane Irene. I think knitters just naturally have a need to nurture those in need with yarny goodness! And I'd just love to win a copy of this book!!
(((hugs)))

Jennifer said...

I LOVE SUNFLOWERS! Your pictures and your yarn bombs are BEAUTIFUL! I have only seen beautiful yarn bombing in pictures and I have not done any yet. I live in a very, very rural area and would probably have the same experience as in another comment - if anybody saw it I would never know and the critters would probably chew on it! I'm going to give it a try, though and see!

the1jennylynn@gmail.com

Stoney said...

My sunflowers didn't do so well this year, either, and I feel that same regret. Oh, next year....

Rather than yarn bomb, I do lots of charity knitting. That's how I "bomb" the feeling that someone is alone in a world where no one cares. My handmade knitted caps and scarves let the recipient know that love still exists.

spirit.in.stoney@gmail.com

moonbabyk said...

Well yarn bombing I think it is a great idea I live in Utah and not long ago our great blazing needles did a big yarn bombing job in park city Utah they did an entire bridge. Its great advertising for working yur creative bug and keeping the love of beautiful yarns alive. I would love me a chance to win a copy of this great book, pick me please thanks!

Janelle said...

I haven't yarn bombed yet, but I want to! And I have a lead on a great place to do so (just outside a downtown art gallery). So I may be trying that soon.... Otherwise, I do some charity knitting from time to time, or donate a knit item to a charity auction. If this book is anywhere as good as their last one, it'll be a hit!

NancyP said...

Yarn bombing has always been an interesting concept but has never grabbed me until seeing your sunflowers. I'm going to have to seriously reconsider engaging in this ativity. Cannot wait for your patterns! My husband and I moved to a new area this summer. I am now getting together with a group of women once a month to knit. So far I've knitted hats for babies and cancer patients, and hand and finger puppets for children getting ready to undergo some procedure or another. I did not seriously consider finger puppets until a friend told me how much they meant to her adult daughter when she was a young child and spent a lot of time in the hospital getting blood drawn.

Rose Lane farm said...

I have just learned of yarn bombing this year at the knitting shop, The Crooked Stitch, in town. Several have done things around the shop - such as sign posts and the benches on the sidewalks and it looks really neat. I'd like to participate next year. We also knit and collect charity hats at our shop.

limegirl said...

I love yarn bombing! Haven't had the oportunity to participate yet!Our yarn shops and quilds here in Rochester NY do a lot of charitable knitting.
This looks like a great book!
my email is knitbit@yahoo.com

stufenzumgericht said...

Last year, I participated in "A Cap Full of Life" where I knitted nearly a douzen of caps for babies in the 3. world- does this count?
And this year I collected sewing starter kits for the flood victims in Queensland and donated a quilt for Japan...but that's all fabric and no wool ;-)
Your sunflowers make me smile :-)
Martina

Pat W. said...

While I was visiting in Dallas last month I went down to the Cultural Center to see a Yarn Bomb. It truely was amazing. I've never actually participated in a "bombing" but have have done some Charity knitting. Through my Mom I've done some knitting for the Linus Project and recently knitted some snuggles for my local animal shelter. Love the sunflowers!

grammynan said...

I have seen it. I can't say I love it. But I could see it being really fun to do with a group of knitters you love being with. Love..love the sunflowers. I just bought some Julia to make your sunflower pillow cover and I can't wait to get started.

adodds said...

I haven't yarn bombed. Our local knitting store entwined the sign posts outside her store with knitting and crochet.
I have done quite a bit of charity knitting, mostly hats and blankets. The book looks interesting and inspiring.

Susan B. said...

I think yarn bombing is fantastic. I've never seen it in person, only photos on the internet. I have never considered doing it myself simply because I don't have enough time and energy to knit the things I want to knit for myself and my family, let alone a "disposable" project. But I think the idea is wonderful and I would definitely contribute to a larger group that was yarn bombing if I lived in a more urban area where there were more knitters around.

Kamin said...

Love the sunflowers! Yarn bombing is always fun and unexpected to see when out and about in different towns. My favorite craft activism has to be making chemo caps and hats for oncology patients, young and old. Although, making new born booties and hats for the neo-natal babies ranks at the top also.

T. Crockett said...

I've never seen any yarn bombing except on the web, but I like the idea. Each winter when I pass the iconic Minuteman statue in my town, I feel like he needs a scarf, or maybe a hat to fight that New England cold.

Casey said...

What a wonderful and whimsical art form! Driving past a field of knit and felted sunflowers would lift my heart and put a smile on my face.
Casey
ashefamily@yahoo.com

norskiknits said...

I love your sunflowers! I think yarn bombing is fun and you are brilliant to post these on your blog. I did it once and it was fun. Norskiknits

bcaster said...

I don't even know what you are talking about - yarn bombing. But I love knitting and just started a beginners class at the local library hoping to start a regular knitters club. We've started small and last week we had a grandmother show up with her two grandchildren who she thought would spend their time in the children's library while she knitted, but they both (boy 9, girls 10) jumped right in. I was esp. impressed with the boy who concentrated for an hour & a half to learn this new thing. Hooray for the simple life. ps, love your blog which I just found via Living Crafts mag.

denise said...

yarn bombing sounds wonderful i have done charity knitting in the past and will cont fractured wrist 2 d ago surg scheduled nxt wk some good reading would be great can't wait to begin knitting for someone again and give back to my community

Dawn said...

I like the concept of yarn bombing, kind of like Christo with his 6 miles of fabric over the Arkansas river. A random, purposeful, organic art event. But my ingrained Yankee sensibility abhors the waste of the yarn. I need that sweater more than that tree/fence/statue does!
It's never happened in my town. If it did, it'd probably be considered 3-D graffiti and promptly be cleaned up.

Lyssa said...

I haven't done it, but I've run across some occasionally and it makes me so happy. I really should add some so I can spread that silly happiness to someone else!

teabird said...

Oh, how I love sunflowers! I've yarn-bombed by knitting dozens of hats for preemie and scarves for countless surprised people. I'd love to read your book!
I'm teabird on twitter and Ravelry...

Marianna said...

There is no yarn bombing in my small corner of the world but that may have to change...I knit for charities, both local and national. Thanks for the giveaway! Love the sunflowers.

Susan said...

I have never seen yarn-bombing in person, but have seen pictures on many of the knitting blogs I read. I do charity knitting for Project Linus and the Red Scarf project (and I understand Norma is one of the featured knitters in this book!). I would love to own this book. Thanks for the opportunity to win it.

Elizabeth D said...

Yarn bombing just makes me smile. So goofy and "useless" and wonderful.

Activism I do? 10 years of afghans for Afghans, and a whole lot of other things. Most recently completed, with 5 friends, a blanket for someone who lost everything in last spring's Joplin tornado. It's on our blog, Two Left Feet (don't know how to link from phone).

Ashley W said...

I love the idea of yarn bombing. I got really excited one day walking around DC because there was a tree covered in yarn. Then, I realized that I was standing in front of a yarn store. :)

Marie said...

I've never yarn bombed personally, nor seen evidence in my town...but I have seen it when visiting my daughter in New York City. I love the idea--how can you not smile when you seen an unexpected "boost" in an environment from the hands of knitters? My "yarn activism" includes knitting for Children in Common (past) and Oxfam, as well as donating boxes of needles, yarn and patterns from time to time to both shelters and mailing them to prisons and hospitals

caroline aka FiberTribe said...

We had some crochet yarnbombing in our tiny town of 180 people. Someone crocheted a colorful wrapping of the one of the rails on a garden corral in front of the local eco-lodge. I think it's a great way to put fun into craft and also to raise public awareness of the art of craft as in public art. And its a great way to keep yarn scraps out of landfill...

Patt Ward said...

What beautiful sunflowers! I just grow the ones we like to eat, but those look so Happy! My yarn bombing is one that I do during Lent each year. I do a "40 Days for others." I give up knitting for myself and knit for others for the 40 days. I have been knitting baby items for the past 5 years and donating them to our Crisis Pregnancy Center.I get others to join me and we can sure "bomb" the center right after Easter.I have always been meaning to try out the Julia yarn and haven't got a round to it. So I did go to Webs and order a lot. I have been making some cute Christmas stockings for gifts at work this year. The yarn is wonderful! I only wish i had got around to it sooner!

Lisa C. said...

I've never seen yarn bombing or participated in it. Sometimes when I start digging through my yarn stash and have it spread all over the floor, it looks like a bomb has hit. Does that count?

Pat said...

I have never done a yarn bombing. However I saw one in Ann Arbor MI last year. They are great. Maybe some day I'll do one in the small city I live in, Tecumseh. I do knit for our local charities that give hats and mittens to the schools and homeless shelters. I also have demonstrated hand spinning at area public and nursery schools. I'm on Ravelry and Facebook.

Anonymous said...

i was born and bred a kansas girl, so these sunflowers are my heart. can i yarn bomb my own yard? gorgeous.

fireartisans@gmail.com

tal said...

i yarn bombed a stop sign in a little seaside town on vacation two summers ago. last summer when we returned, it was still there. i'm already scheming for next summer's 'bomb'. something with a bit more punch and meaning this time!

Sonja said...

I just learned about yarn bombing this summer from some photos...then just saw a bunch on trees in downtown Seattle festooned with stripes. I LOVE this idea, and have been wondering how to get the right size for a tree...I also love the expression...AND that although it is extremely hip and popular in "this" crowd, most people would have no idea what I was talking about if I said it. I want to sneak a little yarn bombed tree sweater onto a tree at my son's school. I once gave away a scarf I had just made by knitting strips of fabric together to a total stranger because she liked it. BTW, I think you are an exquisite artist!
Sonja at sheepinajeep@ihmail.com

Robin V said...

Hi! I followed a link from Gale's block, which brought me here to those lovely sunflowers - real and not-so-real!

I've never seen any real, live yarn bombing, though I've seen various articles & photos. I think it's interesting - but I love the idea of yarn-bombing with knitted items, that can then be put to use - e.g. the scarves in Easton PA, or the hats that I've heard about in Grand Rapids MI.

I knit for family & friends, and also for charities - the Red Scarf Project; the Seita Scholars (a local variety of that same effort); angel blankets for hospitals; afghans for Afghans; Ministry with Community (a local shelter).

Loved Gail & Joan's first book, "Shear Spirit," and look forward to reading this new book.

RobinV (at Ravelry)

Hearthling said...

I love the idea of yarnbombing, but I've only seen it online. Great idea that sets my mind whirring with things I could do, but I've not taken the step yet. It might be a good way to start the new year, though. Maybe one little yarn bomb a month let as we take our walks in the neighbourhood.

I knit for my two grown daughters mostly, and for their friends when they request it. I used to do charity knitting, but I've gotten away from that because I'm always trying to fill up "care packages" for my daughters that live in the states. Maybe I can get back to that this coming new year, too. I've already warned my daughters that the coming year will be bringing fewer knits, but more interesting ones, so that should free up some time for yarnbombing and charity. Hmmm, I think a plan is developing. :D

xylia_brown AT btinternet DOT com

slmiller8 said...

I've never seen a "live" yarn bombing, only pictures. And I've never done it-i guess I'm too busy trying to get my other "practical" projects done, like sweaters, etc. But somethings like your knitted sunflowers are very cool-that's more my style than covering a parking meter.

JFibers said...

Ahhh... I love yarn bombing. I collaborated with a few other knitters for out local yarn store's knit graffiti. Here's a link to the facebook page:
http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.439864959596.237495.68843184596&type=1
It was so much fun!!!
Greenlady on Ravelry

Linda Carlson said...

Love the concept and the Easton project. Will be mentioning it in the Parenting Press newsletter, parentingpress.com/ezine.html, where we publish a community service project each month. As for me, yes, I knit, sew and crochet for charity, mostly baby sweaters and jackets for Lutheran World Relief layettes (am finishing a crocheted one now and just finished a jacket made of Cookie Monster style blue "fur" left from a friend's project) and doll clothes for homeless kids, for a nonprofit that serves them, and for the play therapy rooms in their schools. (info@lindacarlson.com)

Roberta said...

Yarn bombing done in Duluth Mn :)
I knit wool hats (lotz) and had them to students I see without a hat, many college students, and also to the many homeless. love seeing a smile.

meredith MC said...

I've wanted to yarn bomb for a long time. The yarnbombs I've seen in my town-Eugene, Or.- are gorgeous, random and rare. I love the unexpected pop of woolly color juxtaposed against the stark urban environment where I've seen them. My favorite so far is a colorwork (!) piece sewn to a parking meter. It's been there for a year now.
mermcoelho@hotmail.com