Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Yearlings Lamb

Our yearling ewes have begun to lamb. This is abnormal as they usually are not mature enough to lamb early in February. A sheep gestates for 5 months which means these ewes were fertile in September. We usually expect yearlings to lamb in April or sometimes not until their second year.


So far, five out of six yearling ewes have been successful and taken on their mothering roles with gusto. The last one, who lambed yesterday in the front pasture of our farmhouse, left its lamb in the snow. By the time we found it, we coudn't figure out who was the mom. Our only choice was to bring him into the house as he was down and out and very cold. How do you figure out if a sheep is hypothermic? Very scientific - you stick your finger into their mouth and if it is ice cold, you know. After situating him in front of the heating grate, he slowly came to life after about 4 hours. 


Last night he baaahhhed all night long. He will go down to the barns this afternoon and join the other bottle lambs. It is too bad his mama didn't know what to do but as with humans, some mothers are better than others. Some it just takes time to catch on to their mothering responsibilities. With this lamb, we didn't have time to fool around as it would be getting dark and it surely would have been a frozen lambsicle by morning.

What a way to cheer up your day! I'm sorry everyone. That is how it is with sheep farming -- take the good with the bad and move on. 

12 comments:

Adaliza said...

Poor little chap - good job he was born on a farm where you look out for your babes. He needs a little crochet/knitted coat to keep him warm!
a x

Selma said...

Poot thing, hope he'll be okay!

Anonymous said...

it is so nice you are so attentive I love the fact you five us the good and the bad, it is real life.

fracksmom

Sheep Camp adventures of a Shepherdess said...

I am feeling your frustration. We had a yearling ewe the other night who could not figure out what was coming out of her. Once it did she wanted nothing to do with it. We had to hold her down every 2 hours for the lamb to nurse (makes for a long night). By morning she decided she liked the lamb now she won't let any of us near it. We lucked out no bottle lamb.It is nice to know we are in such good company. GO SHEEP!

Benita said...

At least you were able to save him. He's a cutie!

shabby girl said...

He is so lucky that you found him and snuggled him into the house! He's adorable!

Cathy said...

Glad you found him. He's cute as a newly knit baby sweater! Hopefully his momma will watch the others this year and do better next round. Thanks again for my fix of cute lamb pix!

Unknown said...

He is so precious! I've never been around sheep/lambs, but I can just imagine how incredibly soft they must feel. So happy you found him and brought him in to care for him!

Reneelynn said...

Think he's smiling in that last pic! ;)

Dana S. Whitney said...

He doesn't look much worse for the near-lambsicle experience. Good for you.

Kate G said...

Reality checks a;ways welcome, Kristin. Your family runs a terrific farm. Hope you feel better soon. Congrats on the wallpaper assignment.

PS. I hope there are new lamb cards in your shop when the work slows down. Some if the recent shot would be lovely in sepia!

sheepyhollow said...

Lucky fellow! Hope you & family feel better soon!!!