Friday, April 24, 2015

Carol Sucloski's Lace Yarn Studio + A Giveaway

Many years ago when I was working the booth for CEY at a Stitches Market, an animated, friendly, and passionate knitter introduced herself as a "fan". This woman was named Carol Sucloski and I will always remember that meeting. I was impressed by her intelligence and humor, and her love for knitting and yarn. I had been in the yarn business for at least 15 years and was defintely jaded. She was just beginning to explore all that it had to offer. She was a lawyer by training and taking time off from her career to raise her 3 children. I think her passion for the law was being supplanted by her passion for knitting and yarn and color. 

Fast forward a few years later to the days of the growing knitting community on the internet.... Carol and I kept in touch. She started a hand dyed yarn business called Black Bunny Fibers and had a very active blog called Go Knit In Your Hat. She did awesome book reviews which I always looked forward to because they were honest and very well written and researched. I was lucky to have 2 of my books reviewed on her site. 

Now it is a few more years later and Carol has become an author of 4 knitting books and many articles for many knitting magazines including Vogue Knitting and Yarn Market News. She is a popular teacher at different knitting events too. Carol and I still keep in touch and so I was happy to see her newest book called Lace Yarn Studio: Garments, Hats, and Fresh Ideas for Lace Weight Yarns which has just been published by Lark Books.  



I will be honest with you all - because that is how I am. Carol has asked me to design for each of her books. They have all featured sock weight or very fine yarns. I have always declined because I personally do not care for knitting with such fine yarn. It's just not for me but I know it is for so many of you knitters out there. Lace weight yarns such as KidSilk Haze (Rowan), Silky Alpaca Lace (CEY), Manos' Lace, and more have incredible yardage and boast gorgeous fiber content. 

Knitting with these kinds of lace yarns is incredibly reasonable price wise because they will occupy a lot of your knitting time. Although the cost of the yarn may be high per ball, a project can take many hours so the cost per hour of enjoyment is very low. When I heard about Carol's new book Lace Yarn Studio featuring different projects using lace yarn, I jumped at the chance to feature it here. 



Lace Yarn Studio begins with all you need to know about knitting with lace weight and fingering yarns. Needles to use, gauge, working with coned yarns which are typically used for weaving and knitting machines, fiber content, tips, blocking, yarn substitution, and more. The book is set up by number of skeins needed for a project. The amazing thing about working with lace weight yarns is some projects will call for a very small needle size. But then there are those which will use a needle much larger to create a lacey-airy project. There is a lot of versatility with lace weight yarns and Carol shows many beautiful projects. 



I love these delicate cabled very long fingerless gloves with a ruched edging design above.



This beautiful cabled mini cowl is made of Kidsilk Haze in a lovely purple color. Stunning. 



This scarf is a bit more "lace traditional" in its styling. It has a lace column edging and a lace diamond pattern that grows out of the columns. Very pretty.  



This scarf design features hand-dyed lace yarn in two colors. This is an interesting way to use up odds and ends of yarns you can't bear to throw away or perhaps have not bought enough of. The green edging is knit vertically and then the main part of the shawl uses stitches that are picked up along the very long edge to create the larger brown section. You could make it larger and turn it into a pretty shawl to wear during the cooler days of summer.  



This shawl uses a pretty stitch created with a lifted stitch to make floats of yarn giving a lovely texture to the finished fabric.  



Lace weight yarns can also create a fabric which is more typically thought of as machine knit or ready to wear weight. Look at this incredible skirt above which has beads added in the knitting. Can you imagine the drape and hand it has? Pure luxury knit in coned Colrain Lace (50% merino, 50% tencel from Webs). 



Lace Yarn Studio isn't all about the accessories. This very practical cardigan features some pleats for shaping. It is definitely a design that can move from day to evening and is incredibly versatile. 


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So here is what I have for you all today. Lark Books, Carol's publisher, has donated two copies of Lace Yarn Studio. Two of you will be lucky to win this beautiful new book! Check out Carol's website where she sells her lovely yarns
Here's how you enter......

Answer the following question in the comments: Tell me if you like knitting with fine yarns and why OR 
tell me what weight yarn you prefer to knit with and why. 

For this contest there will be 2 lucky winners!
Contest ends Monday April 27th at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. US Residents only. 

AS ALWAYS - PLEASE LEAVE AN EASY WAY TO GET A HOLD OF YOU - EMAIL, RAV, BLOGGER ID. US Residents only.


Contest is over. Congrats to Lynette and Mary Kate. The book will be shipped to you once I receive your Post Office Mailing Address. 

59 comments:

Joanne O said...

I like knitting lace weight. I just don't like wearing it. So fingering or DK weight yarns are my go-to's. Except I just bought for the first time, lace weight linen yarn. I suspect I will like wearing it.
Rav: Jio

Karen Budnick said...

I like knitting with finer yarns (especially love sport weight) because smaller needles are more comfortable in my hands. Anything above a size 5 feels clunky. I should learn to knit continental style and probably wouldn't have this problem! Lace is a challenge but I love it - thanks!
karenswb on Rav

Savannagal said...

I recently knit for the first time with Kidsilk Haze. It was a cowl that was entirely stockinette, except for a few rows of seed stitch at each end to keep it from curling. I love it! I had never knit with lace weight yarn and I really enjoyed it. I even bought another ball of Kidsilk Haze and a couple pattern books as well. I don't know if I have the skill to make anything in them, but one can dream, right??

PghCathy said...

I like lace weight yarns, but my hands don't; they ache after knitting for any length of time. DK is my preferred weight.

Karen said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Wendy Wilken said...

I too don't knit much with lace weight. It frustrates me to no end. With that said, I had a dear friend bring some qiviut home from Alaska. I did make a scarf and a hat, but have a couple more skeins to knit. These patterns would be lovely! Honestly, lace weight is the weight I avoid! Might be time to change that a bit!
ravid:nendy

Frances said...

Kristin, I think that you know that I love playing with colors via fair isle knitting. Fingering weight yarns are perfect for this, and the seeming intricacy of such designs really comes down to just using two colors on a row. (Three every so often.)

Lace weight yarn is something I've also explored in the past couple of years as I knit some traditional Shetland Hap shawls. I've learned a lot about this technique by following some excellent patterns, and now want to try to design some of my own.

The Lace Yarn Studio photographs that you've shown us, let me know that this book is a winner!

xo

wenhkc said...

I like any weight except chunky and lace weight. I don't like the look of chunky yarns, and lace weight looks like gobbly-goop to me for the first few rows. Thanks for the generous give-away!

Abe said...

I like anything from lace to Aran, anything thicker looks funny to me.

Peggy D said...

I like knitting with fine yarns (fingerling)since it doesn't get too cold here. Heavy knits in my climate don't get a lot of use but my lightweight knits do.
peggyspins on RAV

jderouin55 said...

I can do lace once I get started my stitches or not as even maybe I need more practice

yetunde said...

I like fine weight yarn because I like to make shawl and love to use it to make socks. Lost of socks

Anonymous said...

Hello Kristin,
I prefer lite worsted/DK or finer for knits for me- I find I will wear the item more. With that, I have Strokkur, an Aran weigh Icelandic pullover on my needles, as a result of this past cold winter!
Thank you,
Joanne
Johalley on RAV

Amy Calkins said...

I love to knit with fingering weight or sock yarn because of all the detail I can capture in a small space (or a large one). It's also about how much knitting I get for my money. Finally, knitting with thick yarn hurts my wrists and hands and I cannot do it for very long.

Lisa Viviano said...

I'm an addicted sock knitter so I love fine yarn. I've only used lace weight a couple of times and find it takes a little time to get used to handling it. Ravelry: lisarviviano

Patty said...

I love knitting with fine yarns for the very reason Kristin mentioned--a lot of entertainment value from one small skein. Even a relatively large stash of sock or lace yarn takes up very small volume. When I travel I like to pick out one skein of sock yarn as a sourvenir. Always room to tuck that in my suitcase to take home.

from 'neath the blue skies of VT,
the Vermonster, Patty M.

Lynda said...

It took many years of knitting for me to discover lace weight yarns. I think I avoided them because it just seemed beyond me - following charts, etc. Fortunately I gave it a try and discovered I love it. Certainly the appearance of Ravelry and the exposure to so many beautiful designs and instruction via the internet has helped. I do prefer knitting with finer needles - I've enjoyed sock knitting for many years, but an occasional sweater or hat in a heavier gauge is always a welcome change!
This book looks lovely, with a lot of variety. Thank you Kristin for the chance to add one to our knitting libraries.
Lynda (lejaros@gmail.com

Poohtum on Ravelry said...

I like a DK or worsted weight yarn for myself. My young teen daughter can wear a chunky weight so I get to try many weights of yarn.

Spiffypaws said...

I knit w/ lace weight yarns all the time because I live in Florida and have no choice if I want to keep on knitting.

lynette said...

In the past I have been a little too intimidated by lace weight yarn to attempt much. I just ventured into sock weight yarn about a year ago and have enjoyed that more than I imagined, so with some hesitancy and perhaps a good motivation, I would like to try a small project.

lynettelarkins at gmail

Anonymous said...

I like knitting with everything and I love doing lace patterns! This looks like a great book!

Lesa

Deb said...

I love knitting with lace weight. Love the fabric and light air look of it. The patterns you have shown are wonderful. Thank you for sharing this book.

Deb said...

I love knitting with lace weight. Love the fabric and light air look of it. The patterns you have shown are wonderful. Thank you for sharing this book.

Jane said...

I love knitting with lace-weight because my projects dont outrun my budget. the things that come from lace-weight yarn are gorgeous, too.
Jane

Marilyn's Studio said...

I love knitting socks and have accomplished ONE lace weight shawl which I'm very proud of. I'd like to win this book to make a summer shawl for my daughter who is, sadly, allergic to wool. There are some lovely alpaca blends that will work for her.
Just started your blog and am really enjoying it.

Thanks,
Marilyn Pearson

jaschipf said...

I like knitting with lace weight because it is so portable for travel. However only socks and lace-I go for a fatter yarn when it is stockinette, garter, cables, etc. I am waaaaaay too impatient - I want results! It's also nice to go back & forth. Ok -face it -all yarn is scrumptious & delicious & I am an equal opportunity knitter! LOL Book looks fantastic-would love to have!😀Rav ID: Ettenna

cllcraft said...

I prefer working with DK/worsted weight yarns, but I do have a cowl on the needles in a lace weight. I like working with this yarn (much to my surprise), but, it takes practice to work the finer stitches so that I don't loose one. I'd love to try a more challenging project in the future.

Kristy said...

I have found that the longer I've knitted, the more I've begun to gravitate towards finer yarns. In a yarn store, I may try to be as aimless as possible, but my hands will gravitate more and more to skeins that are finer and silkier, which seems to be hand in hand so often. It's not just that I'm attracted to the finer yarns in the skein. I also like a fabric that has more drape. In addition, having more yardage for your buck is always a great thing, since I'm a process knitter.
Rav: kbryson77

JackieLemon said...

I love knitting with all weights of yarn, although I do find chunky yarns and cotton hard on my hands. I love knitting with lace weight for some of the reasons you stated: I love the drapey fabric,and the economy of getting lots of knitting time with lace weight. This is definitely a book I will check out.

GerryART said...

Fingering weight has been my yarn of choice since 2009 because I've had a passion for knitting sox.
By now my sock drawers are filled with more than forty pair of sox.
Hubby has more than twenty. Many pair have been gifted to family and friends.
During this span I seem to have collected my share of lace weight. I have a couple for lace-weight projects in mind. Just have to make the plunge.
Would enjoy Carol's book for all the info it appears she has included.
hugs 'n smiles,
Gerry

Sam I Am...... said...

I have never knit with fine yarns so I don't really know if I would like to or not. Worsted weight is my favorite but I am loving the socks I am knitting (AWS...as we speak) in your Regia Springtime that I purchased from you! It IS magic!
Love your blog and I love color so I will probably HAVE to have your new book eventually too!

Lmephx@gmail.com said...

I love knitting with all kinds of yarns and have been enjoying combining finer yarns with heavier ones to create more depth and texture in my projects. The possibilities are endless!

Judy Wilkinson said...

I definitely like knitting with lace, fingering or sport weight yarns, as I think the garments I make feel great with these weights. I live in Virginia, which gets cold, but is not like living in a northern state, so the lighter weight is more versatile here as well.
Judy W

Mimisgirl on Rav said...

sorry, I left comment as Judy W, and no way to contact me. I am Mimisgirl on Ravelry. Thx,
Judy W again!!

Anonymous said...

Hi Kristin,
First off my confession: I don't like bulky/chunky yarns. Sure, they knit up quickly but in my humble opinion aren't that attractive.
So that takes me to lighter weights. Considering that I've got needle sets down to 00000 - well, that should tell you something.
I love the detail possible with fine yarns and enjoy adding beads when possible. That allows me to indulge two of my passions at once - knitting and beading.
That looks like a lovely book and thank you so much for offering it to some lucky knitter!
Roxanne RASmartWay@gmail.com

Anonymous said...

I like to knit with fine yarns because I've just started knitting lacy garments and I'm LOVING IT! I also knit a LOT of socks and although I occasionally gift a pair, I prefer to make them for myself. I'm currently working with Kidsilk Haze and doing a pattern out of a Victorian lace knitting book. I love knitting books! Thank you for the opportunity. I am theresa326 on ravelry.

TracyK said...

I'm a light-weight myself... Fingering is probably my favorite but lace is a very close second. I'm particularly fond of the "bang for my buck" factor you mentioned. I have some of Carol's beautiful yarn and her other "Studio" book and I've been drooling over this one since its release. Thanks to you and the publisher for the chance to win!

Carrie said...

I've preferred knitting mostly with worsted-wight yarn and bulkier because I don't have tons of knitting experience -- I crochet more. But I am trying to do more with lighter weight yarns because my goals is to knit socks! I actually just made my first pair, but they were worsted weight wool.

LannieK said...

Before last year and Laura Nelkin's MClub, I didn't really want to try fine yarns because I associated them with small needles. Small needles and me don't really get along well. But all the fine yarns and designs ended up using size 5 needles - which I find comfortable. I have also found that the type of needle, wood or metal, makes a huge difference. Glad I tried-opened up what has become my favorite yarns. Thanks for the chance to win!

Kathleen said...

Fingering weight is my favorite yarn to knit with. I'm not sure why but it may have to do with the fact that I like super-pointy needles and usually have to go down at least one size to get gauge as I knit very, very loosely. I do have a stash of lace weight yarn and like to crochet scarves with it.
schorknit is my Ravelry ID

Holly in CT said...

I like knitting with sock or fingering weight yarn because I like wearing the fabric it makes.

Casey said...

I work with sock weight the most, love making shawls and socks. My 2nd is bulky, knitting up big, comfy sweaters that hug you all winter long!
Casey
ashefamily(at)yahoo(dot)com

craftsonthego said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

HI Kristin,

I am just a beginning knitter but am attracted to the fine yarns because of the delicacy they lend to patterns. I come from a knitting family and remember folks knitting things with fine (I think cotton) yarns, such as baptismal caps and doilie-like items and always admired the beautiful intricacy and delicacy of such things.

I would love to win one of the books as i am learning and assembling a little library of my own... anyway, thanks for your blog very fun and informative!
Best REgards,
Bunny
(verdantgreenery@gmail.com)

beth said...

I've mostly knitted on sport weight and worsted. I don't know if I prefer them since I haven't knitted with lace weight. This book looks lovely. Beautiful photos and the projects are wonderful. I'd enjoy taking a stab at lace knitting with a book like that! Thanks for the giveaway.

pwitry@rcn.com said...


I like knitting with dk or sport weight yarn. It is thick enough to produce a finished garment quickly and thin enough that the fabric it produces is lightweight and pleasant to the touch. That said, I just knit fingerless gloves for my niece and I might have to make a pair for myself! They feel delicious and are like wearing dragonfly wings.
Mary Kate
pwitry@rcn.com

bookagent said...

I tend to knit lace weight in the summertime and heavier weights the rest of the year. That gives me pieces suited to all 4 seasons!! Great book, thanks for the giveaway.

Pam
ROCknit Ravelry id

Anonymous said...

Laceweight is not my first choice usually but some of the patterns in this book do seem to be calling my name. Thanks for the opportunity to win a copy of this book. pegmac0728@yahoo.com

Lynn said...

I like knitting with finer yarns, fingering weight usually, because I like the weight of the resulting fabric and I like holding smaller needles.

Pauly Heller said...

I love knitting with lace weight yarn. The trick for me is find finding the right size needles and gauge for a lovely drape and there's no way to know how it will look without knitting up a swatch of two or three.

Laura Ferdal said...

I love knotting with light yarn and would love to try out the patterns in this fabulous book!
Thanks,
merryorganic@gmail.com

Kara said...

I think my favorite is fingering weight, it is so versatile for sweaters and accessories, but I'm just starting a lace weight project and it already is looking lovely, so I may become a convert! I'm kleinwitz on rav...

Therese said...

I love knitting socks with sock yarn, using US#0 or #00 needles for a firm fabric.

I also like to use fine wool for lace- knitting with larger needles. I'm about to start a project using US#9 and some laceweight spun Icelandic wool.

Anonymous said...

I was going to say I tend not like the fine or bulky yarns but that is not true. I recently finished a lopi sweater and loved the knitting. Basically I just love wonderful yarn be it skinny or fat! It is true that I tend towards the middle with fingering to worsted weight. I have lots of weaving yarn that would be fine for knitting. This book has lots of neat patterns. Thanks for the giveaway. gnlmutti at gmail.com

Vera said...

Looks like a fabulous book! Thanks for the chance. Just getting back into knitting after a decade or so and am enjoying. Am working on a lace-work shawl which I am loving and I want to learn to knit sox. And I love knitting with linen yarn.

Anonymous said...

Oh that book looks wonderful. I love knitting with lace & fingering. I love knitting shawls & scarfs and prefer fingering for gloves/fingerless gloves. Also- I like lighter weight yarns for sweaters. I think it makes them easier for layering. Also- it adds less bulk. Thanks for the opportunity!
b-girl on ravelry or bacooper8 on yahoo

Patty Clark said...

I love lace knitting, so fine and feminine. This looks like a wonderful book. Thank you for showing it.
pclark204@comcast.net

jennifer.auroradesign said...

I've finally learned after years and years of knitting that I like fine yarns and repetition. My favorite sweaters have been knit on size three needles or smaller. And, while I can do cables and lace and all sorts of crazy stitches—simple,easy-to-memorize patterns suit me best.

Sandra said...

I love knitting lacy shawls with fine yarns. It really engages my brain to see the intricate patterns emerge from the needles. I also like to block lace pieces and see how the pattern tidies up nice and neat. I'm a mechanical engineer by vocation, and knitting with fine yarns seems to combine art, technology, and mathematics. Rav ID: SnowyMtnKnitter