Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Candy Box for All + A Melanie Falick STC Giveaway

Easter is coming soon and when I think back to the holidays of my youth, it seems there was always a box of Russell Stover's candy passed around the Sunday dinner table. My sisters and I would look longingly at the lovely chocolate covered confections in dark and milk chocolate, trying hard to decide which ONE we would eat. It was a dicey decision because we were only allowed one. If we picked the wrong one, one that had one of those icky fillings, you were stuck. Eat it or leave it. I usually ate it. As the box sat aging on the bureau in the dining room, the candies would slowly disappear. All except the odd flavors that none of us liked. Those candies would be left in the box, one small bite out of each, to age until my mother got sick of looking at the box and it would be thrown out.


Many of the lambs that were born this winter have been eating hay for awhile. They still look to their mothers for milk, but their diet is becoming what an adult sheep eats - hay and baleage. Baleage is "pickled grass". The Farmer harvested it last year and it has been wrapped in white agricultural plastic fermenting and waiting to be fed to the sheep now when the grass isn't growing.

The Farmer uses his tractor to bring a new bale of either dry hay or baleage to the feed bunk. It helps if I am around because these things are really heavy (500 to 800 lbs). The little lambs are always just waiting to dive into the hay and my job is to make sure the bale doesn't land on any of them. It's rather dicey and scary because it doesn't take much to squish a lamb. After plopping the bale down, it is time to unwrap the bale and see what the feed looks like. For the sheep and lambs, I liken this moment to unwrapping that box of Russell Stovers candy from the holidays.


They start picking at it, looking for the bits they like. Sheep are all about the feed. I can tell that some bales taste better than others. They just smell better - sweeter and pungent. Some of the bales seem to disappear quickly and then others hang around for a couple of days. Hay is made up of several different kinds of forage including timothy, blue grass, fescue, alfalfa, and red and white clover.


It's good exercise peeling the hay away, unwrapping the preserved grass that is wrapped circularly like a giant scroll of paper and feeding it out down the line. The mature mama sheep are on one side of the feed bunk, ravenously waiting, never mind that they always have feed in the field - they want to try the new bale! The lambs are on the other side, picking at the hay before we can unwrap it. 

 

It takes about a day or two to go through a bale. As the lambs continue to grow, we will go through more feed. We always hope we have enough to make it through until the grass starts growing. Then the sheep and lambs will transition to fresh green grass.

All this talk about candy boxes of all kinds.....  Have I got a grown-up candy box for all of you creative types! My friend Melanie Falick, Editor of STC Craft Books has donated four of her newest book titles in honor of my 5th blog anniversary! All of Melanie's books are creative maker's eye candy. But although drop dead gorgeous - they are not just fluff. They are full of great how-to instruction, well-thought out book construction, and stylish book design. STC published Knitting For Baby, the book Melanie and I did together just after we both had our children back in the early part of this century (wow, does that sound weird - the century thing, that is).

Here's what I've today for you as a giveaway. Thanks to Melanie and the other fine folks at her publishing house STC for donating the following books. I wish I could enter! They are all incredibly wonderful titles!
Crafting a Meaningful Home by Meg Mateo Ilasco
Oliver and S Little Things to Sew by Liesl Gibson - a beautiful collection of sewing patterns to sew for children
Stitch Magic - A Compendium of Techniques for Stitching Fabric into Exciting New Forms and Fashions by Alison Reid - a very creative sewing book from a designer in the UK
And lastly........
A Knitters Home Companion by Michelle Edwards. Here's a nice video interview with Michelle. Do you know her writing and illustrations? Check out her blog - it is truly beautiful. I really wish I could keep this one!


Here's how you enter: Answer the following question in the comments section: 
If you had to pick one book that changed your life, that helped you to change course, or that you can't imagine not having on your bookshelf forever, which one is it? The book doesn't need to be a knitting or craft book - just any book that you adore.....

Please, don't forget to leave me an easy way to get a hold of you! Contest ends at midnight on Thursday. I'll let you know who wins on Friday.

Contest is over. Thanks to all who entered! If you get a chance, read through all the comments. There are some really great book ideas! The winner is Ellen. She said:
Robinson Crusoe - when I was in second grade we moved outside of easy walking distance to the library, so I had to dig into the set of classics we had at home. Been digging ever since!

120 comments:

Mary G said...

Easy ... Knitting Without Tears! I had a hard time teaching myself to knit till I read EZ's book when I was 8 .... I've never looked back!

Enjoy ....

Bonney said...

I just read "What is the What" by Dave Eggers and it has really changed the way I look at the world. This book was heartbreaking and one of the best crafted works of literature I've ever read. I just ordered several copies to give to friends. I would recommend it everyone.

Geri said...

"The Woman's Room" by Marilyn French in 1977. It was what initiated the beginning of my active participation in women's liberation, rights and issues.

The D said...

Stardust, by Neil Gaiman. I read it several times a year. My email is whyeatcrayons03 *at* yahoo . com

thanks for having these giveaways!

Sarah said...

This is so cliche - I've had the same copy of Pride and Prejudice since I was 13, and read it over a dozen times - at least once a year and probably more.

(email: sthomson06 **at** gmail **dot** com)

Hallie said...

Fahrenheit 451... That being said, it is nothing that I would have read on my own. It's crazy to even think that it is my favorite, but from the time I read it as a freshman in HS I have always been amazed at the foresight the author had in writing something so advanced and true... so many years before his time!

Now, I find that I read much lighter books... :)

Helen said...

My favorite childhood book. Harold and the Purple Crayon. It just is so imaginative. I have gifted it to several children and have seen the results. One young friend had his own "crayon" that he carried with him drawing all sorts of things. It was actually a glitter wand which made it even more adorable.

jdbknits said...

Not sure about changed my life but The Outliers was a book that really opened my eyes and changed my perspective about a lot of things. Also the Pillars of the Earth.

Debbie said...

Florence Nightingale.

Betty said...

"The Artist's Way" by Julia Cameron was a life-changer. I journeyed, with a wonderful group of women, through the 12 chapters over the course of one year.

Jan said...

Noah's Garden" Restoring the Ecology of our own Backyards by Sara Stein really helped me see how connected we are to nature. It also helped me overcome a fear of spiders (though I still don't like them in the house).

Resident Squint said...

"Women In The Material World", a photobook about women and their families from over 20 different cultures. It shows how all these different women live and shares their different views on life, family, and their society. A very inspirational book.

lindayoung at earthlinkdotnet

jordiw said...

Knitting Without Tears. I still have my 1971 first edition copy and still look things up in it. I fell in love with Elizabeth's voice and learned that there was a lot more than just knit and purl and that I could make things that both looked and felt good. Amazing woman, amazing book

billicummings said...

That was a difficult question but I'm gonna go with Charlotte's Web. When I was in 4th grade (1965) I chose to read and report on CW. I really never liked reading until then. My world opened up after that and I was forever reading until my mom turned out my light.

Sally said...

Ooooh....luscious books! My biggest life changer would probably be Diet for a Small Planet. But there are lots of runners up too. Thanks, Kristin!!!

Kate said...

This is hard because there are so many that have changed my life. The one that jumps out at me off the top of my head is The World According to Garp when I was a teenager. I still keep the same copy on a nearby shelf.

Nicholas said...

Foucault's The History of Sexuality, Volume One completely changed my life: the way I think about the work I do, the ways in which I experience the world, and how I try to present myself. Craziness.

nicholaselliott (at) gmail (dot) come

Erin Leigh said...

Ok, people are going to roll their eyes when they read this, but I cannot honestly answer any other way. The Bible, and I'm forever changed because of it.

eowyn1220(at)comcast(dot)net

Jani said...

THere are many, but the one that jumped to my mind first was "Everyday Zen" by Joko Beck - absolutely turned me around. Thanks for the giveaway!

(ravname is peepsmom)

Dolly said...

Actually the author that has changed my life is Michael Pollan. THE OMNIVORES DILEMA is probably my favorite.

Carla said...

I just can't name ONE book- I work in Library land- just can't do it......but still want to WIN -:-)

JFibers said...

When I was younger, my mom told me that she had read every book (twice) in her one room school house library. Her favorite book, she gave to me to read. As a result, it became my favorite too. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.

Julia (mb at diegesis dot net) said...

I definitely found an answering chord in my heart for The Omnivore's Dilemma, but in the interest of adding to this wonderful list of books I'm going to mention Ursula LeGuin's The Dispossessed.

shelley said...

Omnivore's Dilemma was the first book that popped into my mind too. Another book that I am reading that is going to be life changing is The Healthy Home by Dr. Myron Wentz and Dave Wentz. I have loved and been inspired by other books, but these have actually changed how I conduct my life significantly. Please give my thanks to Melanie and STC for donating the books. Generous.

Norma from Misty Haven Alpacas said...

With WINGS, There are No Barriers by Sue Augustine.
The subtitle is "A Woman's Guide to a Life of Magnificent Possibilities".
Read at a time in my life when I needed the skills to make myself find the happiness that I didn't know existed.

homewithjessica said...

There was always something about "A Picture of Dorian Gray". I can't put my finger on why, but I think it came at that perfect point in my life.

I read it every year, and I even collect different copies of it!

all of these books look great, thanks for the giveaway!

Robin Allen said...

My own book, IF YOU CAN'T STAND THE HEAT, a clean, humorous, amateur sleuth mystery, which I was notified today is available a month early. Writing a book--and having it released into the world--can change you as much as reading a book, right Kristin? I'm looking forward to the changes.

A book I read that literally changed the direction of my thoughts, dreams, and life is RUNNING FROM SAFETY by Richard Bach (the guy who wrote JONATHAN LIVINGSTON SEAGULL, which I haven't read.)

-R

Jen said...

I have loved A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith for a long time. It is the book that got me into reading when I was young and it forever changed me.

Bonnie said...

The book would be HANNAH COULTER BY
WENDELL BERRY. I have read it 3 times and still gather much depth of community being knit together, loss within modernity, family and marital roots, roots to land, and of course, Berry says he is Hannah, Jayber Crow and Andy Catlett! I love that he wrote Hannah Coulter in first person narrative and gave her a story of thankfulness. Gorgeously written sentences that made the soul sing.

anythingbutsnow said...

I would have to say that my one book is A Trip to the Stars by Nicholas Christopher. It speaks of an interconnectedness of being, a reason for the madness and that there are patterns and pathways in life that we can only marvel at. When my husband was wounded in Iraq it was hard to make sense of life changing so drastically and this book really helped to give life a peculiar and creative perspective that I appreciated.
littlenutmegproductions-at-gmail-dot-com

Melissa said...

Probably my organic chemistry textbook. That, in conjunction with the professor I had fall semester, pretty much turned me away from any thoughts of medical school. Weird choice, eh?

Marg said...

C. S. Lewis, all the books in the Narnia series. The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe was first read to me by a supply teacher in Grade 3 (a LONG time ago) - but I have reread them many times and always find something new that speaks to me.

AllisonInPhilly said...

Thanks for the intro to baleage! I learn so much on your blog.

As for the book, it's Paula Wolfert's Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean. It is hands-down my favorite cookbook of all time. It transports me to wonderful kitchens and, even though I grew up in the Upper Midwestern casserole tradition, has revealed my true north in terms of cuisine.

Rudee said...

I would have to say reading Dr. Ira Byock's books, Dying Well and The Four Things That Matter Most, literally changed my life. I read them while preparing for the death of my mother in law and found my calling as a hospice nurse. It only took 30 years, but I'd say I found my niche.

Beth said...

Oh, what a hard question! I read For the Children's Sake by Susan Schaeffer McCauley when my oldest was about five and it opened my eyes and heart to the kind of mother and educator I wanted to be. I'm a grandmother now and am so very thankful for the influence that book had in my life and the life of my children. The books written and illustrated by Tasha Tudor and also books written about her have also been treasures.

Jodi said...

I have two. The first is one I read when I was 8, I was having trouble reading so I practiced all summer reading The Neighbors Up the Hill- now I love to read. The other is My Utmost For His Highest by Oswald Chambers - great daily devotions!

anne said...

My gut reaction was The Grapes of Wrath--I read it in high school and I can read it every summer and be transported right into the book. But then I thought and it would be every book my 4th grade teacher read aloud including: The Witches, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, and The Phantom Tollbooth because that's when I discovered how awesome chapter books were and never looked back. Thanks Mr. Z! My address is annecalhounmt at gmail dot com

Anonymous said...

"A Shepherd Looks at the 23rd Psalm". Have you read it? Great lessons to be learned from a shepherd!
Marcia
westitch@comcast.net

Sara said...

The book that I can never part with is my first copy of "Mrs. Mike" by Benedict & Nancy Freedman - a novel about a girl from Boston in the 1800's who marries a Canadian Monty and moves to Alberta Canada - I have no idea why this book speaks to me so much - but it is all about women's lives, and the hardships of raising a family in the wilderness.
sarabyron@att.net

Auntie Shan said...

"SONGLINES" by BRUCE CHATWIN

It's THE Book that I gift to People who are in need of good "read" or direction in Their Lives...

It was 1st brought to my attention by an Actor Friend [who is actually quoted in the book] that used to be babysat by Bruce on occasion. On that "LIST of People Dead or Alive That I Wish I could Talk To", He's pretty high up on the "AUTHOR" one!

It's very multi-"woven" and You either *GET* it or You "don't"... Sadly, enough, the Ones who Don't, are the Ones who NEED *to* "GET" it!!

Gmaggie said...

Actually a book I read as a child in my local elementary school's Summer Reading Program geared at getting kids hooked on reading - and stay out of trouble over the summer! One of the first books I read that summer was The Witch of Blackbird Pond. I don't even remember much about it now, but it was that book that made me realize reading was entertaining and could transport you absolutely anywhere. I knew then that I loved reading and never wanted to stop - and I never have!

JackieLemon said...

I was always a voracious reader starting with "The Three Little Kittens" before I was in school(I still have that book). For my 12th birthday, my mother gave me "Anne of Green Gables" and that opened up a whole new world of literature for me. I reread it every year around my birthday and still love it.
pjlemon@roadrunner.com

d said...

Gift From The Sea is the book I always return to; its one of the only books I've read several times over now! It really helps to center things.

bookboxer on ravelry

Melissa Morgan-Oakes said...

When I was quite young, maybe 6, my Aunt Pru sent me hardcovers of the first 3 books of the Little House series for Christmas. A precocious early reader, I inhaled them and breathed deeply a way of life I instinctively knew I wanted.

It's taken me all of my life to come even close to the level of self-sufficiency I have yearned for since then. I don't believe the books changed me, but they gave me a clear hope of what I could be.

myartfullife said...

This is a really tough question, as there are so many books that I have loved, but I think I'll have to say it was the Laura Ingalls Wilder's "Little House ..." books. I think she provided the map for my lifelong pursuit of homemade clothing, domestic accessories and embellishments, food, kitchen gardens, and the pursuit for the village lifestyle -- while living in an urban setting. Thanks for the giveaway, Kristin, and congratulations on your 5th blogabirthday!

Anne said...

I could (honestly) say it was your first knitting book which I repeatedly checked out of the library and finally just had to buy my own copy, but I'm going with a non-craft book. How to Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk shaped the way I communicated with my young kids and has affected the way I talk with lots of people. For instance, I learned that I had no idea how to give a compliment (be clear and specific--not "your room looks great" but "I see that you put away your toys, made your bed, and organized your desk. Good job!" ) I practiced on random strangers and the first few times I flushed bright red and felt like an idiot. Yikes!

Fun question and great prizes!

Anne said...

it's impossible for me to pick just one as so many come to mind. But the book always on my nightstand and that inspired me from a young age is Sarah Midda's South of France. The tiny watercolors just transport me to a different world. And craft related is Crocheting in Plain English by Maggie Righetti. It got me crocheting again after a decade away and then led me to Knitting in Plain English, and the rest is history! :) annegp on Ravelry

Laura said...

Anna Karenina. I felt her hopelessness so strongly, and was glad for my hope in Christ. Also, although not a book, the play "Twigs" that I saw with Cloris Leachman in a one woman show, showed me that I was not crazy and was indeed an abused woman and I needed to do something about it.

Gina Power said...

When I was a teen my 4H club sponsored a Dale Carnegie course, "How to Win Friends and Influence People" helped me change from a shy teen to a confident young adult.
The books are lovely, as are your lamb pictures, it's always a treat to read/look at your blog.

Gina
power.gina1@gmail.com

beth said...

For me it is Anne LaMotte's Bird by Bird. I recommend it to creative types who suffer with the curse of perfectionism. It's pithy, funny and has helped me out of many log jams in my creative life.

mjknits said...

"Nobody's Girl" by Hector Malot. Given to me by my mother when I was in the 4th grade(it was one of her favorite books), I've re-read it every few years since. I've really enjoyed reading these comments-and picked up some great suggestions for my next visit to the library:)Thanks!

maryjn@earthlink.net

Kate said...

To Kill a Mocking Bird. I loved it when I read it in Jr. High, and I loved revisiting it when my son read it last year. I cannot wait until my daughter reads it next year! I am hoping she chooses it for summer reading this year.

kristinfitzgerald on Ravelry

adodds said...

I can't imagine picking just one. I read several of the above comments, thinking to myself that yes, that's a great book, oh another great book, and another. Luckily we live in a worlds where books are readily accessible. Can't imagine life without them.

TheAntiquePalette said...

Add me to the eye roller pile: The Bible. It's taught me how to lead a good life, given me hope for the earth and mankind and a connection to God.

On a more down to earth plane: Dr Dolittle stories by Hugh Lofting. I read them over a lonely summer at 10 years old. Completely changed my view of animals, sticks with me to this day at 55....

Susan said...

I've been an avid reader all my life, so hard to choose. But I think the book that got me started was Little House in the Big Woods, read aloud by my second grade teacher. I find myself rereading the whole series every few years with fresh eyes. And a more "mature" series that I love is The Lord of the Rings. What a picture of a "questing" life, struggling with hardship, fighting evil, and resting at the end.

sbsford(at)gmail(dot)com

Claudine said...

for knitting
Jane Sowerby's "Victorian Lace Today" and EZ's books helped me realize I could probably knit just about anything. They taught me how to do things and to feel empowered.

for life
Wives and Daughters by Elizabeth Gaskell, I still love Molly Gibson with all my heart.

Diane North said...

Tough one while sitting in our library..and "Weekend Knitting" by Melanie is peeking down at me. I would have to say Greene on Greens..Bert Greene was an amazing food writer who was way ahead of his time; this work provides stories and recipes for tons of vegetables, in alphabetical order. Your next question has to be "what blog changed our lives" == you know that! I only read 3 regularly and you are one of the three.

Bernadette said...

Had a bit of postpartum OCD/anxiety after my son was born."Stop Obsessing!" literally changed the way I thought about my anxiety and let me know I was not alone.

Mary Ann said...

Full Catastrophe Living - I bought it out of desperation to help me get through the first Christmas after my brother's suicide. The insights still help me now, years later.

Spudknit said...

I cannot imagine not having a copy of Pride and Prejudice. It has such an amazing ability to calm and slow me down. The language invites me in to another world that I love.

Robin C said...

I too must say My Bible. It's a Criswell Study Bible and I don't think they are published anymore. My husband gave it to me when I was baptised in 1987. Another book that I cherish is "Leaves of Gold" that my father gave me when I was a young girl. He's been gone for a long time and I cherish it because he wanted me to have it. In fact, I guess you could say the same thing about my Bible.

Eileenb said...

"Creating Your Best Life" by Caroline Adams Miller has literally changed my life - when I read it in August 2009 I was looking to find my next "career" after motherhood and I am proud to say that now I am the Executive Producer of the first Musical about Breast Cancer called "Breast In Show:" that debuts in October 2011.

Sharon said...

I remember reading "The Family Nobody Wanted" when I was in high school. The books is abouta family adopting many kids of different cultures and races. It stuck with me, sitting in the back of my mind. Flash forward 20 years and I was in China as a single mom, adopting the first of my two China girls. I believe that book started me down the path to my girls.

amyroz said...

The BIBLE (King James Version) It covers everything! amyroz ravelry

Christine said...

My dictionary!!! the one that I won in the spelling bee in 6th grade, and have used forever. I have a big girl's one now! I love it.

Christina Wall said...

Ah, Knitting Around by Elizabeth Zimmermann. This book changed the way I looked at knitting and gave me the confidence I needed to "think" and "Knit" outside the box. I don't know where I would be without that book and just can't imagine my bookshelf without it.
christina(dot)classiccables(at)gmail.com

Bev said...

with out a doubt Julia Cameron's "The Artists Way" made a huge change in my life personally and artistically

I still fight with the inner critic, but at least now I know it for what it is!!

I adore reading your blog and look forward to the pictures of the lambs

Kelsie B said...

I have two actually. Dr. Seuss' "Oh The Places You'll Go" is the first. I was given a copy when I graduated from high school and on my way to college. Whenever things get a little out of whack around here or I just don't know where things are going I always go back to that and realize I will get to where I need to be just maybe not in the way I thought. The other is an original copy of EZ's "Knitting Without Tears" that my grandmother gave me right before she succumbed to the ravages of Alzheimer's and no longer remembers ever knitting or even who I am.

I can be reached at : okyarngoddess@gmail.com

Lisa said...

In second grade I read The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and immediately became addicted to reading. At this early age I realized I could travel anywhere or learn anything through books. My love for cooking, gardening and knitting grew from my love of books.
vivianos3@aol.com

Shannon said...

This is a very tough question since I love to read so much. But I would have to say the one that has changed my life the most would be the Bible. It has given me great peace and wisdom and a guideline to live my life by. Thanks for a great giveaway!
skyeaton@insightbb.com

Angela said...

"Wouldn't Take Nothing For My Journey Now" by Maya Angelou is a book I can't imagine not having on my shelf.

Anonymous said...

Always Coming Home, by Ursula LeGuin, has had the most impact on me of all the life-changers. Jane Austen's Persuasion is a strong second. There's a host of books I could never do without, though.

No need to enter me in this contest - I just wanted to pipe up for my books.
-- Gretchen

Susan said...

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley. I was a sophomore in high school and had to do a book report. It had me thinking faster than I could write and the ideas and inner questions just kept coming. It was the first totally adult book that moved me and made me look at my world with new eyes.

isofungi@mail.com

Susan said...

typo on my email! I want to win!

isofungi@gmail.com

Barbara L. said...

"Eat, Pray, Love" definitely made an impression on me. I would like to be as brave as the author to go off on her own to find herself. I may never do this but I wish I could.

Ravelry ID: knityid

Terri D. said...

I'd have to choose Maggie Righetti's Knitting in Plain English...the book that really did demystify the stitches, made me laugh, and turned me into a knitter.

tonya said...

My book would be Captivating by John and Stacy Eldridge. Turned me on to God, being female and a whole better way of living my life.

Karen Barrett said...

I was going to say "The Little Prince," by Saint-Exupery because of the quotes from it I have carried around with me as an adult, but in really thinking about it, it's got to be "Little Women" by Louisa May Alcott. It's a classic family tale--who can't remember Marmie, Jo, Amy, Meg, and of course Beth?

llamalady said...

I don't know that I have a favorite book, but a favorite author, for sure! Any book by Thorton Burgess. I love nature and I loved to believe that the animals could talk with each other. I loved the Merry Little Breezes and Grandfather Frog. My Mom has a couple Thorton Burgess picture books from when she was a girl. They are worn out and have been rescued with contact paper to keep it all intact.

Margie said...

The one book I can't live without is A Field Guide to Wildflowers: Northeastern and North-Central North America (Peterson Field Guides). Native plants and land restoration is my passion, along with knitting. I could spend all day looking at plants - while knitting of course. Thanks.

Fibercrafter said...

Who Has Seen the Wind by W.O. Mitchell. It was the first book to help me understand spirituality, from a child's perspective. It was read to us in grade school by the most exceptional teacher.

Sally

Bonnie said...

Everyday Sacred by Sue Bender. Thanks for having the giveaway, and congratulations on your blogiversary!

nancy said...

Full Catastrophe Living by Jon Kabat-Zinn. Since reading his book and taking meditation classes, I've been much more able to deal with all that life has thrown at me. A real life-changer!

nancylerer@yahoo.com

fracksmom said...

I have always been a reader, so many books I have loved, but I will have to say the only book I reread is the Bible. At every age there is something new.

Fracksmom on Ravelry

Carolyn said...

It would have to be "Knitting for Dummies" I'm mostly self-taught, and I started knitting in the late 90's. The internet wasn't what it is today, so I wanted something basic. I still refer to it. It's a great basic book!

Sue said...

Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy. I read it in high school and learned that perseverance in all things-life, love, work - and never being too proud to get your hands dirty are two character traits that will allow you to survive anything. (And it doesn't hurt that the hero, Gabriel, was a sheep farmer!)

ellen said...

Robinson Crusoe - when I was in second grade we moved outside of easy walking distance to the library, so I had to dig into the set of classics we had at home. Been digging ever since!

Wendy said...

I just found your blog today through a friend. What a generous giveaway! Too hard to narrow it down to one book, but definitely the Bible and another life-changing one is Animal, Vegetable, Miracle, by Barbara Kingsolver.

Susan said...

The book that I can't live without is the Moosewood vegetarian cookbook. My copy is in pieces and stained but I try to keep it safe because I still use it often.

Tracie said...

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. I love the recipes but even more, it has made me look at my family's consumption differently. I try to buy as much local produce as possible and even in the colder months, I think about where my food has come from and try to buy things that are produced close to my home.

phaedra96 said...

I have to say my Bible. It is an archeological studay Bible and I love it! As for wordly fiction; I would go with Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice or The Lord of the Rings. Just in case; let't throw in anything Stepanie Pearl McPhee has out and I am waiting for the new one!

Leslie said...

Two books will always have a home in my home. I read both Little Women and Little Men in elementary school and have loved them ever since. I'd love to win the books you are offering!
Leslie
bagatelle@comcast.net

Meg said...

My answer would be A Town Like Alice by Nevile Shute. I read it as a teenager and I fell in love with Australia. Thus encouraging me to apply for AFS as an exchange student. I never made it to Australia, instead I was placed in New Zealand...Christchurch as a matter of fact. 25 years ago! It was the best year of my life and has been the one experience that has had the greatest impact for me. It it wasn't for Alice...I would never (I guess I can't say never) have pushed to go as a 17year old. Great memories...thanks for asking! Meg mfreeman@ne.rr.com

Anonymous said...

My all time favorite novel is titled "In This House of Brede" about a career executive, a widow whose only child has died in dreadful circumstances, who converts to Catholicism. She subsequently feels called to be a Benedictine nun in an enclosed abbey. Her story and those of her fellow nuns somehow comforts and calms me when I'm upset. It's a wonderful story, beautifully told and I reread it frequently--but not when knitting! Pam bpamela@lycos.com

Cami said...

"Reading Lolita in Tehran" I will never take for granted the freedom I enjoy living in America!

Jan said...

A book I adore is "Jane Eyre" - yes, I know, pretty lame... but I read it over and over again and the message of forgiveness and redemption shines ever clearer every time I read it. It always touches me.
Janice
granniejans@yahoo.com

Trinity said...

I am generally not a re-reader of books because there are just SO MANY that I want to read. Generally I would rather keep reading new ones. However, when I was in elementary school I read the first book in the Boxcar Children series a few times. That book was such a good fit for me at the time and has really stuck with me. I remember so vividly how the kids learned to take care of themselves and each other. And, of course, it has a happy ending. I should probably read it again to see if it is as awesome as I remember it being.
trinknitty.com and trinknitty on ravelry

denise said...

tuesdays with morrie by mitch albom a great book on the meaning of life and our mortality, I read this book once a year as a source of enlightment.
great contest great blog
enjoying all the lamb stories and recipes
my late husband was 1/2 greek so lamb has always been part of our holiday feasts- the children were not to keen on lamb as youngsters but now they ask for it
life is grand and simplicity so pure
thank you for sharing so much of your life with
us Denise dpluta2001@yahoo.com

Linda Susan said...

So many titles come to mind but one of the most pwerful I've read in the last year is Uncle Tom's Cabin. I was amazed at how one man could keep his faith in both God and mankind after being so unjustly treated by those around him. A very powerful story.
Susie at susiedelo@gmail.com

Rcstampyd said...

Its hard to chose just one book! Gaia's Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture by Toby Hemenway. Changed the way I looked at my garden.

Intertwined: The Art of Handspun Yarn, Modern Patterns, and Creative Spinning by Lexi Boeger. When I found this book I feel in love with yarn and got fiber animals to add to my Permaculture farm! :)

tjf said...

Absolutely the Bible. It is fun to read through the comments - lots of ideas for good reading and lots of reminders of favorite books I've read. Kristin, thanks for sharing your life through your blog - it is high on my list of favorite reading!
Tricia
thefankells@mesanetworks.net

Charlene said...

Where The Wild Thing Are is just the best! I read it to my son when he was little and have it enjoyed many times since then. I just discovered a knitting pattern for the crown,I think it must be based on the movie version. To bad my son is 24 now I think he would have loved it back then. Thanks for the great contest!Charlene ma2vt@comcast.net

Libby said...

There are several but to select one I will choose a book that was always around (and before I was born) - my Mother's Betty Crocker Cookbook - 1950 Edition. Before I could read I carefully paged through it and the color photos and b&w decorations enchanted me. Later, I pored over the recipes and later I made the recipes. Now the book belongs to me and just a glimpse of the dilapidated cover brings the past, present and future to me.

Judy said...

Hands down it is Knitting Without Tears. This book opened up my creativity and allowed me think out 'outside the box' on all sorts of issues, not just knitting!

Aunt Nancy said...

"Jonathan Livingston Seagull" is different to the other gulls in his flock. He doesn't live to eat, but eats to live and pursue his passion: flight. But his search for perfection and speed doesn't endear him to the other seagulls, that eventually expel him from the flock for daring to be different.

This book for me is timeless, in 1970 it taught me that I could be myself and I will always have it on my bookshelf and plan to pass it to my grandchilden.

sanchezn@hr.msu.edu

Gerri said...

I don't know the answer. Bits and pieces coming together to make a whole (me). Will have to scan the shelves. If this doesn't count, that's OK!

Gerri greenboatgb@netscape.net

Marlaine said...

For me, the book I wouldn't want to go missing from my shelf would be "Wishcraft" by Barbara Sher. Whenever I need help planning out the next adventure in my life, this is the book that I turn to for help. Once I know where I'm heading, the rest of my bookshelf comes to my aid!

Marlaine
mdescham@nycap.rr.com

Anonymous said...

~ A book I absolutely loVed as a child was: The Wheel on the School, by Meindert DeJong, illustrated by Maurice Sendak. The setting is Holland, with Sendak's black & white watercolor washes and the children of Shora, who help storks come back to their village against many odds is just a wonderful story. A little girl is the 1st to Wonder Why storks have not returned. I have read it many times myself and to children friends. The children are very strong-willed & it reminds me of what can be done with the right intention. So, with that thought, I MUST mention a 2nd more current book I've read about seven times, Three Cups of Tea, by Greg Mortenson. ~ This book was beautifully LIFE changing for me. Greg clearly exemplifies what can be done with the right intention. I feel that perhaps I'll go to another country and help with schooling somehow.
~ Glad to read the other posts & find new books to read.
Shell ~
YarnSoup@yahoo.com

jennifer said...

The first three books from the Cat Who series by Lillian Braun Jackson. I was given the 3-in 1 volume in highschool and it's been all around the world with me. It's like a comfy afghan and a cup of tea in a book! Couldn't live without it.

Lynn said...

The book that changed my life for the better is Creative Visualization by Shakti Guain. I now recommend it to clients all the time. About postive affirmation.
lynnc66@comcast.net

Macy said...

Blackbirds on Nantucket. The first book I was allowed to take home from the Nantucket Library as a little girl. Opened up all the possibilities of reading(and was wicked scary, too)!

Kathy at Knitting Off The Grid said...

Too many to choose from, but one that really changed my course in life was "Principles of Knitting" because without it, I'd never have completed TKGA's Masters program, opened a yarn shop, taught knitting, designed professionally and now make socks!

tehachapisockcompany@gmail.com

SandyH said...

I think it was Little Women! I had put off for years reading it as a young girl. Thought it must be too "girly" for me. I was swept away by the book and have read it over and over many times. My daughters have loved it just as much.

Sandy Harsh

sandyharsh@gmail.com

Louise said...

Knitting in America came out when I was living in a small Caribbean island. I'm sure I was the only knitter there, and felt very isolated. Somehow I got a copy of Melanie's book and discovered there was a whole knitting world out there. It was very exciting. I found out about Stitches and made plans to go. I even met you there, Kristin. It was in king-of-Prussia in 1997.

cathy said...

Gone With the Wind. It brought Civil War history alive for me, and made me a lifelong history buff.

margaret said...

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou. I read this as a young woman and while theoretically I have nothing in common with the author, I could identify with her story and her words changed how I viewed myself.

Jenny said...

Kid's Knitting by Melanie Falick...no kidding, it's the book I used to teach my daughter to knit!

I can be reached at grdepa@yahoo.com

Jennifer said...

The Self-Sufficient Life and How to Live It

by,
John Seymour

But at the moment I am nose deep in The Baby Book, Dr. Sears!

jduskwind at gmail dot com

mascanlon said...

Pride and Prejudice always, over and over. I never tire of the sotry and characters. Thanks!

mascanlon49 at hotmail.com

Sharon themadknitter said...

The book that stands out for me is As I Lay Dying.. It just stands out to me.