Thursday, May 19, 2016

Wild Things


Boy, I do love spring. Color and nature burst forth at such a rapid rate that it is hard to take it all in. I especially love the spring wildflowers. Over the years, I have discovered patches of different kinds of wildflowers. Each spring, I go looking again to see if they are blooming in the same spot. 

This year, along our road, next to a little stream that dries out in the summer, there was a massive group of beautiful maroon trillium. I couldn't believe my luck in seeing them. They are done now but I was lucky enough to get a few photos to share. 




Bluets are not very rare but they sure are pretty.  I love the dainty little flowers and the pretty light bluish-purple tinge on the outside of the petals. They remind me of the forget-me-knots my Mom and Dad grew in their garden although they are much closer to the ground. 


This little yellow flower is new to me. My neighbor Debbie told me about them in the cemetery on East Hill. I'm not sure what they are called (do you?) but they are so delicate and have mottled leaves.



This whitish-green flower was next to the trilliums. It was so elegant. I don't know its name either. I'm hoping one of my readers might know. 


The Virginia Bluebells in my garden are almost done. 


The flowering quince is one of my favorite spring flowering shrubs. Love the color.


I hope you get a chance to enjoy the wildflowers where you live.

Here are the wild puppies Beau and Sadie rolling around on their still favorite moss. Giant puppies. 


We've got a new litter of kittens. Here is Spunky.


Here is Spot. I'm looking for homes for both of them if you are in the market for a farm-raised kitten with good hunting instinct. 

8 comments:

Winding Ways said...

Your mystery flower is a trout lily.

Chris said...

Yes, I was going to say the same thing. I have them here in Oregon too-very sweet.

Savannagal said...

http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/woodland/plants/yl_troutlily.html

They're in Illinois too, but hard to find now that invasive species have choked our woodlands practically to death. Same goes for our trilliums. I'm glad to see you have healthy patches in your area.

Auntie Shan said...

We've got white trilliums [the Ontario Provincial flower actually] in our backyard [transplanted years ago from New Brunswick]. Surprisingly, they were one of our earliest bloomers this year! The main plant is under the lilac tree... They apparently love the shade and moisture. And when you pick the blooms, the white ones fade to a pale lilac colour. - Actually, if you have a damp shady spot near the house, you could always transplant a few.
Meanwhile, we still only have 2 tulips in the front yard, while everyone else have tons of them! ;-[ But the Lilies-of-the-Valley are coming along. Hopefully, they'll out-number the dandelions! -- The temps have been all over the map here for well over a month now, so it's no wonder that the plants can't decide on when to come up! "Suppose" to be WARM this weekend, so we'll have to see what pops up!
:-D

Heather Forsythe said...

Trout lily., but a few others beat me to it. Great native wildflower. Enjoy, I love watching nature come alive this time of year!

Anonymous said...

As others have said the mottled leafed flower is trout lily because of the spots like a trout. But we always called them dog toothed violets. The grew all over our property in Michigan's Upper Peninsula where I grew up. Love the wildflowers and the pups photos.
Peggy

Anonymous said...

White flower might be one of the Solomens Seal. There are several varieties.
Peggy

Laura from beautiful West Michigan said...

Thanks for the beautiful flower pictures! Not only are the trilliums pretty, but I just love saying the word! Doesn't it evoke fairies and sun beams?