Monday, December 15, 2014

Olivia, Celia, + Cirilia + a Magpies, Homebodies + Nomads Book Giveaway

All of my nieces know how to knit. The cousins have been surrounded by women who knit, sew, craft, and create since their births so it seemed natural that they would pick up some needles sometime. I always figure it is good to bring kids into the fold of creating and being involved in projects at an early part of their lives. When I was working on Kristin Knits, I asked my two oldest nieces - Olivia and Celia - if they might like to knit a project for the book. They were maybe 13 and 14 years old at the time. I knew there was a back-up plan if they didn't finish (my sisters). But knit they did. Here are the Olivia and Celia Mittens from Kristin Knits knit by my nieces. 


In the past few years, as all the girls have gone off to school, they have picked up the needles again. Mostly they made smaller projects but then they were tempted by the colorwork sweaters that I have designed. Celia began first with this design which was featured in Fall 2011 Vogue Knitting using my Color By Kristin Yarn. Not bad for her very first sweater!


Two years ago, Olivia began this - her first sweater - from my book Color By Kristin. Brave girl, wouldn't you say?


It has taken her a while but she was determined to finish it Thanksgiving weekend. Olivia also makes pottery and is majoring in Art at university. You can see Olivia's pottery on this post here. On CraftFriday, I helped her with a bit of surgery (the sleeves were too long). I showed her how to cut Fair Isle, pick up stitches and then graft the pieces together. She did it all herself. Here she is with her finished sweater. Once again - pretty amazing for a first sweater - don't you think? 

 
Here are the two girls hamming it up with the wreaths we made out in the snow. I am so proud of them!

 

Which leads me to the reason behind this post..... I have a new book to share with you by knitwear designer and new author Cirilia Rose. I do not know Cirilia but I have just recently received her new book cleverly titled Magpies, Homebodies and Nomads. This book has been recently published by STC/Melanie Falick Books

 

When I received Magpies, Homebodies and Nomads, I was firstly impressed by the cover, the layout and art direction - It is a Melanie Book and they are always guaranteed to be gorgeous. I know how hard Melanie works on all her books and she never disappoints. I have heard of Cirilia because she has worked for Webs, Berroco, and Skacel but I did not know much about her. 



As I looked through the book, I was trying to figure out the concept and the back story behind the quirky title. This is a pattern book but it is more than that. It is the story of a young woman's journey into the land of knitting and design. Let me share part of the introduction because I think Cirilia says it best......

"I've divided the projects in this book into 3 sections that I feel are 3 parts of a knitterly personality. We are all Magpies, collecting small amounts of precious yarns and never knowing what to do with them. We are Homebodies, sometimes preferring the quiet of our own perch, but we are also Nomads, venturing into the world to meet friends and gather inspiration." (from page 8 of Magpies, Homebodies and Nomads)

The photography was done by Jared Flood and Cirilia serves as her own model on the pages, along with (I am assuming) more of her handsome friends. The 25 projects are varied - from scarves, to cowls, hats, fingerless mitts, little sweaters and more.

I was on the fence about reviewing this book here because Magpies, Homebodies and Nomads was not written with me in mind, nor who I think my reader is - not that I really know! I'm a 50 and a half decade knitter/designer who doesn't care much anymore about fashion. I've figured out what I like and wear and knit and I am beyond trying to morph into someone I am not for the sake of fashion. But then I started thinking about who this book was written for and decided that this blog was the perfect place to share it. 


The Studio Pullover uses dyed curly wool locks in multi colors to form a heart design
After seeing my nieces at Thanksgiving - a light bulb moment went off. This book is written with the younger knitter in mind and it does a fabulous job at capturing the wonder of those early years of knitting --- the years where you are just finding your way and your style and discovering what knitting offers you for the rest of your life.  I am including some of my favorite photos of projects from Magpies, Homebodies and Nomads. All of the 25 projects are knit in only one color and are relatively easy to make.


The Jordaan capelet was inspired by a piece of clothing Cirilia found in Europe.




I love this slouchy, easy to knit coat called Gezell.



These elfish looking booties -- named Heima Slippers -- could also be laced with i-cord.



Another use for curly dyed wool locks - the Marion Collar attached to the skim fitting Isla cardigan. (When I was in my 20's I went through a period of using curly locks and thrifted fur tails and collars.)

 

Besides the lovely patterns and photos, Magpies, Homebodies and Nomads includes 4 to 8 pages of essays at the end of each chapter helping the newish knitter learn about color, finding their own style, substituting yarn, travel, thrifting inspiration, and looking for design ideas. Cirilia also includes her current list of favorite books (not all knitting books which is refreshing). 


I am suggesting Magpies, Homebodies and Nomads to you my dear readers as a perfect gift for the younger person in your life who may be interested in picking up knitting or is just beginning. It is beautifully produced and they will be captivated by the pages.  Hopefully it will inspire them to learn and grow as a knitter does - over time - over the decades. It will start them on their lifelong journey and we all know how much fun that can be. 

So here is what I have for all of you today. A chance to win Cirilia's Magpies, Homebodies and Nomads donated by the fine folks at STC/Melanie Falick Books

Here's how you enter. 
Answer the following question in the comments.....

Why did you learn to knit? What sucked you in? Was it the color, the fiber, the community and friends? 

Contest ends Saturday December 20th at 11:59 p.m. 

US Residents only please. As always, leave an easy way to get a hold of you - email, Ravelry or blogger id.

Unfortunately, the book giveaways are only open to US Residents. The reason for this is I ask publishers to donate books and ship the giveaway copies to the winner. Shipping for books to Canada and overseas is extremely expensive because of the weight of the book and the postage charges. In fact, it usually costs more to ship a book than the retail cost of the book. These folks are being nice to me (and my readers) and I think it is unfair for them to incur ridiculous shipping costs. I'm sorry for this if you are an overseas reader but I'm sure you understand my reasoning.

78 comments:

Patt said...

Beautiful book. I can see some of my granddaughters wanting to try some of the pieces. I learned to knit when I was about 11 yrs old. A neighbor's 8 yr old granddaughter was knitting mittens in a dark blue wool for her brother on size 2 double point needles. It was love at first sight! She taught me the basic knit stitch, I taught her to embroider. When she left to go home later in the summer, we exchanged. She gave me 2 needles and a ball of yarn and I gave her a pillow case that I had ironed a pattern on, with needle and embroidery floss. It has been all knitting, all the time since. auntiddaknitsATyahooDOTcom

ajz said...

I learned to knit because it was a goal I had for a long time.annejz on rav

Joanne LaCour said...

I too came from a family of busy hands, my Dad was always working on a project -often a home repair or auto maintenance, my Mom was an early repurposer partially out of necessity! Through Mom I learned to knit, crochet, sew, embroider, as an adult I honed by basic knowledge thru classes and gatherings. I embraced knitting when my daughter, at age 7 said she wanted to learn to knit a hat. Projects flew off her needles, I followed along, searching YouTube to learn how tos. My goal was to knit socks. As my knowledge grew, & my kids needed a gift idea for me, I suggested a Webs gift card. My then 18 yr old son could drive, he went into Webs to buy my gift. Later he commented about Web's variety.....and the staff, "knitters are Hot!" I believe that was the time Cirilia worked at Webs, he had commented she looked familiar when I had a Webs catalog open and she was the model. As a 20 something year old, he now requests hand knit socks...and shares the compliments they generate...and the requests, "do you think your Mom would knit a pair for me.?"

Nancy said...

I learned to knit as a young mom when my neighbor was knitting outfits for her soon to be adopted son. She had over 30 outfits ready when he arrived. Just a bunch of young moms together for company. I didn't knit much until a few years ago. Our kids are now all over 45! I periodically attend classes at a great yarn store not far from me. I started again learning to felt. Learned socks & now do lots of socks, scarves, hats for grandchildren. It's the best way to relax!

Crafty Creations By Cheryl said...

My grandmother taught me when I was younger and then I didn't knit for many years. My hen my best friend was expecting a baby I wanted to make a baby blanket for her. So my mother-in-law's neighbor re taught me and that is all it took. I have been hooked for years.

Anonymous said...

I learned to knit as an exchange student in England. No one in the states was really knitting at that time but it had become popular again there. I have always liked doing creative/crafty things so it was natural that I wanted to knit too. Finished my first project (a vest) just before I had to return home... Been knitting off and on since.

Lesa
laspin1@aol.com

Anonymous said...

There are no knitters in my family but knitting "spoke" to me, I needed to learn! An army wife neighbor showed me the basics, Coats and Clark's "Learn How" book was my resource. I persevered! My daughter and granddaughter knit as well and most of my other grandchildren have at least tried. Jeannine aka j9knits (Raverly id)

Shing Hsieh said...

Kristen, I love the photos of the girls, the transition to adulthood and the gorgeous knits they created. So cool. Although my mom taught me how to knit when I was a wee one, I wasn't hooked until I was in law school as a 30 something. I picked it up again to keep myself from desperately scratching notes and finally learning how to listen.

Rose said...

I came to knitting relatively late, as I was 40, but I've always been a crafter, and as I've been blessed with 2 daughters and 2 stepdaughters, I've been able to share this love with them. Both of my daughters and one stepdaughter learned to knit from me and two out of three love it as much as I do. In fact, they both are much more proficient and daring than I am, so I'd love to win this book for one of them! That way iI'd only have to buy one copy! Thanks for your generosity.

Rose said...

Oops, forgot to answer the question! I learned because I am a tactile person, love the feel of the yarn, and was going through a divorce and needed something to help me deal with my loss, plus I heard it was similar to meditation, which I'm too antsy to do. I've been in love with it ever since!

Sally said...

Hi Kristin-- I love your stories about your family of crafty women. Reminds me of mine! My mother taught my sister and me to knit at Christmastime when we were little. We knit Christmas bells. And after Christmas we knit squares of garter stitch to make a blanket together. What drew/draws me in to knitting and other stitchery is a little voice in my head that is constantly saying, "I could MAKE that!" Lovely book; lovely post! seedesigns on Rav

Anonymous said...

Why did I learn to knit? A neighbor saw me tying yarn together into dolls so she showed me how to knit with needles. The real reason why I got back into knitting was to help calm the aggrevation of pushing a child through the college application process.

sara said...

Hi Kristin, first, thanks for the great giveaway. I have always been a crafter, as far back as I can remember. I made clothes for my Barbie with scraps of fabric. As I got older, I would stay up all night to finish a sewn project so I could wear it to school the next day. Knitting and crochet creeped in to my crafts as well. At 57, I still love learning new things, and knitting projects that are new to me. My favorite craft is knitting, and I research it everyday looking for new ideas from new designers. This book would be special to me, if I were to win it. The items may not be for me, but for my three daughters to wear. thanks again! sara, I'm saradenbo on ravelry

grammynan said...

I have been following Cirilia's career and patterns through the years and I was happy to see that she has finally authored a book! As a child I was plagued with strep throat often and would have to stay home from school and be BORED. In an effort to keep me busy my mom bought me a Learn to Knit kit. I taught myself to knit by reading the instructions and by the way, unknowingly, learned to use the Continental method. I never really had a mentor or any friends who knitted but I have knitted since the age of 9....teaching myself little by little to be what I would describe as intermediate plus. Most of my stash is fingering weight in neutral and "fall" colors. I hope I win!

Teresa said...

My aunt had introduced me to knitting as a child but it didn't stick. As an adult with a teenage child I was waiting for him in a store I wasn't interested in. Across the street was a yarn shop and the window display was drawing me in like a magnet. I left with a book, the wrong yarn but the yarn called for in the scarf pattern recommended for new knitters and the journey began. I am very much a Magpie, certainly a homebody but I enjoy my nomadic adventures.
Where would I be without my knitting?

Hilda said...

Other than the quintessential long purl scarf I made as a youngster, I didn't pick up knitting again until my late 50s. Had been a handcrafter all my life with needlepoint, embroidery, crochet, and more recently quilting. My motivation to learn was that I wanted to knit a pair of socks--and I've stuck to that. Maybe one of these days I'll branch out...
thanks for the giveaway1

Amy Calkins said...

I learned to knit in order to make mittens for my sister. She only got ever got one, but the yarn was pretty ugly, in my defense!

GayleT said...

Kristen I'm like you, color is my life! No one in my family or circle of friends did any handwork when I was young (too many years ago to count lol)but a friend of a friend of my mothers taught me the basics of knitting when I was 13,from there I taught myself from books to crochet, embroider, cross stitch, rug hook,spin,quilt and just about anything that involved fabric or fiber. It has brought me through many hard days and now I have a 1 year old granddaughter that I spend my weekdays with that loves yarn and fabric. And one of my daughters also enjoys creating art so she's about the only one in the family that listens for more than 5 minutes without their eyes starting to glaze over lol! I would like to give her this book.

Annabanana said...

I learned how to knit because I wanted to make colorful sweaters for my kids.

Anonymous said...

My grandmother was the first person who exposed me to knitting. She was swift and efficient with her short needles as she made gloves, socks and stockings.

Despite the fact that she was very encouraging of anything I tried, I am self taught beginning at age 11 when I was in a lovely department store, called Stewarts, in downtown Louisville.

It was there while I was enjoying all the fabric textures and colors that I wandered over to an area of beautiful yarns. I selected a heathery cranberry colored worsted weight wool, a pattern which included "how to knit" instructions and began my first project! It was a vest with button holes and had to be seamed together. It actually turned out quite well for a novice.

If only my grandmother had lived closer to be of some help it would have made for a better result I'm sure. But later she moved closer and she was my first knitting companion! I didn't discover a knitting community until much later in life. I am enjoying two groups at this time and gain so much more than knitting inspiration from the wonderful ladies.

The love for textiles was in my DNA I'm sure. Mine is a great fascination with fabric of any kind, but particularly the creation of fabric and the limitless possibilities is the greatest source of pleasure!

Anonymous said...

I learned to knit from my mom when I was really young. I think I just wanted to have the special time with her. spejo on revelry

Melanie T. said...

I did a lot of crocheting while in college; it helped to maintain my sanity, and of course to further procrastinate.
When I was pregnant with our first child, I wanted to make baby sweaters, so joined a knitting class. I took a long break (did a lot of needlepoint while my eyes were sharp), but have recently joined a knitting group near our new home. I always love looking at colors and fibers in the knit shops, but realize that the knitting group is more than just knitting. It's taking a break from everything, and just relaxing. The friendships I've made will likely last my lifetime. We are friends who started with nothing but a love for knitting in common. They have taught me so much about knitting, about growing old gracefully, and about friendship.

Holly in CT said...

I learned to knit from a neighbor I babysat for when I was 12, made lots of mittens as gifts. I didn't pick it up again until my 13 year old daughter tried to knit a baby blanket for her cousin to be. The baby blanket had cables and bobbles and all sort of complicated stitch patterns. In the process of helping her I got hooked again. I knit for creativity and the zen of knitting.

Karen said...

I come from a long line of crafters. Both my grandmothers crocheted so I learned that as a small child. I took it back up in grad school--stress management and inexpensive but nice gifts to give (think miles of afghans in red heart acrylic.) I taught myself to knit when I stumbled across some lovely yarn on sale at a thrift store that needed to be a knitted vest.

Elizabeth D said...

I started trying to learn to knit when I was 4, because I saw my mother knitting all the time and really wanted to do that. I persisted, and it finally "stuck" when I was 7. Decades later, my mom and I are both still knitting. For me, it's probably color first, but it also has to be yarn that is satisfying to touch. And I love socks.

(Ravelry ID BadInfluence)

Debbie Riley said...

I learned to knit from my mom. When I was young, I was, always wanting new clothes for my dolls. So my mom taught me how to knit. So she could spend more time knitting things for BIG people and it has stuck with me. Altho, I now knit for BIG people :) too.

Julie D. said...

My mom taught me to knit even though I am left-handed. She taught me to knit the same way she knits because you use both hands. The wool was what sucked me in. The feel and the smell of the wool. And next was the color. We bought yarn from a sheep farm that hauled their wool from NY to ME every fall to be spun and each year they brought back a few more colors in natural sheep colors and heathery dyed colors. I loved to visit and squeeze the skeins and smell the wool and buy just a couple skeins each time. The shearling slippers were also the best.

LannieK said...

Have been drawn to fiber related arts for years... so I taught myself to knit ten years ago, finally! Love the textures, the colors, the ability to make something just the way I want it, and the friends :-)
Thanks for the chance to win this beautiful book.
Rav: LannieK

Tracie said...

I started knitting because my grandmother made such beautiful things. My mother liked crewel and cross stitch and taught me those crafts. I let my creative side go dormant until I met my good friend Marlene and she re-introduced me to knitting, this time with luscious fibers like bamboo and merino.

ravelry: tracienix

Kim Har said...

I always had great respect for my Great-Aunt Hilda. In my young eyes she was everything a "LADY" was suppose to be. She had grace, style, pose, kindness, manners, & creativity. After she came home from work she would relax in her over-sized chair and knit. AS a young child it was fascinating to watch her move the needles & yarn around as she would knit suits to wear to work and it seemed that she never made a mistake. When I was in 3rd grade she finally agreed to teach me. I was thrilled to be allowed to set next to her and move those magical needles & yarn around, even though I did make mistakes which she fixed. I so wanted to be the type of lady that I though Great-Aunt Hilda was & every time I pick up my knitting I always think of her & will be eternally rgeatful for everything she taught me, not only about knitting but about life.

Anonymous said...

Hi Kristin,

Catchy book title indeed! I learned to knit as a young expectant mom from my older sister - sometimes over the phone, no less!

Wish I had kept some of the beautiful Aran sweaters and dresses I knitted for my daughter.
RASmartWay@gmail.com

Karen Budnick said...

Hi Kristin, My mom taught me to knit. I wish I hadn't put it down for so long. I'm trying to catch up, though. I'd love to teach my daughter to knit. I think she'd find it a relaxing hobby and get her away from screens. My daughter-in-law is a crocheter and has a mental block about 2 needles. I'm out to create new knitters, one at a time! Karen (karenswb on rav). Thanks!

Anonymous said...

Hi Kristin!
I learned to knit in high school after watching my boyfriend's stepmother knit a sweater for his father. I know I was intrigued, but I'm not sure why. I knit a bit in college & a bit after, but it wasn't until I was in my late 20s that I started knitting again with any consistency and for the past 10+ years I knit almost every day. I love the fact that you can take some sticks and string and make things. I love all of the different yarns that are available and the pattern options are sometimes almost overwhelming. I love the whole thing! Thanks for the opportunity to win this book.
b-girl on Ravelry

cllcraft said...

I had always wanted to learn to knit, but no one in my family were knitters. During a difficult pregnancy, I got a book from the library, and taught myself to knit. My friend who was a knitter helped me figure out how to purl over the phone. Now, I've been a knitter for many years, and have found knitting has soothed and nurtured my soul. Of all the hobby interests over the years, knitting is still my number one interest. It's been a life-long friend.

Carol Pack Urban said...

I agree wholeheartedly with your comment, "I'm a 50 and a half decade knitter/designer who doesn't care much anymore about fashion. I've figured out what I like and wear and knit and I am beyond trying to morph into someone I am not for the sake of fashion."

I taught myself how to knit when I was 21 and wanted to knit for my new baby. I found a magazine with designs for babies. It may have been Women's Day magazine.

I knitted for my children over the years but really got hooked again after my first grandbaby was born.

Now my daughter in law is learning to knit. It gives me so much pleasure to know she loves it as much as I do!

Diane said...

I learned to knit from a close friend soon after I married. We knitted slippers for Christmas gifts. My dad wore size 13 shoe, so you can imagine how long his were! I put down my needles for many years but begin knitting again several years ago. I love the beautiful yarns and the feeling of accomplishment when I finish a project whether it be big or small.

beth said...

What a beautiful book!

I learned to knit in my early 30's when a Japanese friend was staying with us over Christmas. I wanted to be able to knit hats for my boys and she taught me. I've been doing more sewing lately but hankering to get back to knitting now that my arthritic hands are doing better (new meds for RA, hooray!).

Donnaj said...

I cant remember why I learned to knit but I guess my Mum taught me. I continue to knit now as I love the act of knitting and making, creating fabric and oh the colours. Kiwiknitter63 on rav

Nancy Paris said...

I love sweaters with bobbles and cables and color and X's and O's, large and small. When I was about 12 I took a class to make a slipper sock at Walker Scotts in downtown San Diego. That was it. I was off to the races.
Nancy Paris
nparis62050@gmail.com

adodds said...

I started knitting as a very young child so I assume it is because my mom was a prolific knitter and I wanted something to do. Since knitting as always been apart of my life is can't imagine the excitement of learning this wonderful craft. I think this might be a perfect book for my 24 year old daughter who has dabbled but not yet committed to knitting.
Skibum on Rav

Barb T. said...

This is so easy: it was my mother. My sisters and I all wanted to be her. She was a hippie before hippies and homesteaders were. She hooked rugs, she made soap, she dried fruit and made leathers, etc. But most of all, she was a knitter of glorious items for all 3 of us. It was my mother!
barblt99 ravelry

Wanda Sandifer said...

I began knitting in anticipation of retirement and wanted a take-along hobby for traveling or a pick up and put down project for at home. I have 10 grandchildren so the inspiration is unending. I have relied on the internet, the library and my LYS for instruction. I have progressed from small accessories to garments and feel that I learn something from everything that I make. Soon I may have great-grandchildren to inspire me. Knitting just makes me happy.

Goldie Stetten said...

I began sewing beginning in ninth grade out of necessity, uniforms thru eighth grade and then needing a wardrobe facilitated that. I crocheted a wonderful bikini in my 20's. My first knitting projects were 15 years ago in my late 40's and were handbags that I sloppily knit and then washed. It was such a creative process finding the buttons and trims. I'm still not very good at knitting but I've made quite a few hats for my grand babies and daughters, I've made snoods too. I would love to attempt one of your sweaters.

sylvia lindberg said...

I learned to knit when I heard my sister was going to take a class. I thought well if she can learn , so can I !! So so glad I did I have been obsessed since day 1. The book looks beautiful!
yacolt2010@yahoo.com

Dixie said...

I learned to knit in middle age. I had put it off because I also sew, and I didn't want knitting to take me away from sewing. It succeeded in being my favorite pastime for several years, but now I'm happily balancing both loves. I enjoy the color aspect of knitting most of all!
This book looks fabulous and I would love to win it. Thank you for offering give-aways like this!

shabby girl said...

First of all, your nieces did an amazing job on their sweaters! Very impressive. I can't imagine cutting into a Fair Isle anything!

Actually, I can't remember exactly "why" I got into knitting. I watched my mother when I was small, but it took me until my 20's before I actually picked up some needles. I remember a yarn store that fascinated me back then. So many colors and textures. Perhaps it was the challenge to see if I could actually make something. Whatever it was, I'm so thankful. It has brought me such pleasure!
lifeonwheels on Ravelry

knitster said...

I was taught to knit by my grandmother who thought I needed the skill someday. So I guess I was forced to learn. However it stuck and I am still knitting. I think many of these would be great on my niece who I wished lived close so I could teach her how to knit.
NaomiKnitster on ravelry

Linnea said...

My paternal grandmother was a knitter and made wonderful clothes for my dolls. My maternal great-grandmother was a knitter and made mittens for all of us (I'm first of 7 children). She just knit them without a pattern, really fast, and put them on a string to go through the coast sleeves so they wouldn't be lost as easily.

I was amazed and decided to learn to knit. I bought a small pamphlet at the dime store, aluminum needles, and Red Heart yarn (not wool). I taught myself from the book, and then a friend showed me the continental way to knit. I went to town and made long striped scarves for everyone in my family and for my friends. I graduated to sweaters while I was in college, and never stopped. It turns out that knitting is very good for focusing if you have ADD, which I do, but I didn't know it at the time. I don't know how many sweaters I have made and given away. I am 66 and still going. I volunteer at our middle school and teach the 6th graders to knit if they want to learn, because I know it is good for the brain and is also wonderful for making gifts. I love it because it is such a practical skill and so portable. I never sit anywhere without it, as I still have trouble sitting still!

Tracy B said...

I started to knit again because of all of the amazing yarns available, the hip books with patterns, Knitty Gritty, Stitch and Bitch and the community of fabulous Knitsters.

Catherine said...

I learned to knit because I wanted to be as clever as my grandma was with yarn and because my Barbie needed some new clothes.
Ravelry: eastbayknitter

Melia said...

I saw a book in Barnes and Noble and couldn't resist it. I taught myself from that book 14 years ago, and now my 16 year old daughter would love a copy of this book! I loved the feel of the yarn running through my fingers and all the unbelievable varieties of gauge and color and possibilities. Yarn stores still give me a thrill!

melia1127@hotmail.com

Rebekah said...

Hi Kristen,

I remember seeing Celia's first sweater when you first posted about it and thought how brave she was to select a colorwork pattern! And Olivia didn't seem to bat an eyelash, either. I am your neices' age so I love reading about them.

I taught myself to knit when I was fifteen. No one I knew knitted at the time but my mom (who passed away five years earlier), LOVED to craft so my sisters and I picked up crafty sensibilities at an early age. I was drawn to knitting because I really, really wanted to make my own clothes and sewing seemed daunting to me at the time. Knitting seemed like something I could learn.

Thanks so much for hosting! It looks like a fantastic book.

Bonnie said...

Why did you learn to knit? Knitting was an optional class in 8th grade.
What sucked you in? I had already been crocheting with my mother.
Was it the color, the fiber, the community and friends?
I quit knitting because it was cramping my hands until a few years ago. It was the fiber.
Even at a young age, I remember always looking for something other than acrylic. I would find old pattern books with child sized sweaters and make them. Ripping until I got it right and I loved it.
I'm thinking the yarn I did find was probably rayon.
A few years ago I stumbled on a small yarn shop and now all is right in the world.

Wendy Mangum said...

I learned to knit at 41 because I always wanted to do something crafty. All the women in my family sew or cook or crochet. I wanted to join them in that. I also dreamed of giving away all of my knits as gifts, even though I'm just now getting good enough to do that (I've only been knitting for a year). I do also love yarn and fabric and have already stored up quite a bit for future projects that I haven't found yet. I wish I could just knit all the time!

Anonymous said...

I learned to knit as a young child, my mother taught me as her mohter taught her. and I have been teaching friends children to knit. I know several of them who would love this book

Fracksmom

Winsome said...

My mother in law was an avid knitter, and thought that I would love the craft. She was right, the thing I love most about knitting is it's therapeutic effect I get while I am knitting alone, but feel something totally different when I am knitting with my group!
Thanks Kristin!

RAV ID: WinnythePu

HOA Mgr Lady said...

My friend Simone about 30 years ago and it was the variety of yarns.
Ruth Cederstro

Anonymous said...

I begged my Grandmother to teach me to knit when very small. She didn't like to knit & gave me little help. I was fascinated. Soon school, boys, work and lots of other distractions came in. I started again after I got married. My first project? A sweater for my grandmother. I was sucked in by the touch of fiber, the thought of creating with my own 2 hands. I have been a weaver, quilter, knitter and seamstress my whole life. However life has large demands of work and family so I sqeeeeeeze it in as best I can. rav id: Ettenna

Bonnie said...

My mom tried to teach me three times, but it finally stuck in 2008. I'm not sure why it took so long, but once I was hooked, I WAS HOOKED. I haven't stopped knitting since, and my guest room is now more aptly called the Yarn Room. I think the stability of knitting appeals most to me. I know if I do the same motion again and again, I will get fabric. It is something very safe in a sometimes chaotic world.

Meg C said...

Cirilia studied architecture and design before hearing the siren call of knitwear design. Since you've seen the book, I'd love to hear if that background is reflected in her designs.

I learned to knit from my Mum, my sister and I learned together. my Mum believed that all kids should have creative outlets, and she also believed that being productive and creative was a good way to direct the extraordinary energy kids have. She was, as always, right on all counts. I love where knitting and spinning have brought me over the years.

Easy contact is email: caulmare@english.umass.edu

Denise said...

I don't really remember. I think my mother just asked if I wanted to learn to knit and I said yes. I guess I was around 8 yrs old.
flgirl1987 AT yahoo DOT com

Lisa H-L said...

I had moved to Minnesota and was very cold, so I learned to knit a sweater.

Diana C. said...

Why did you learn to knit?
My Grandma and Great Aunt taught me to crochet when I was nine years old. I crocheted off and on throughout my childhood, teen years, and into my twenties before I decided I'd love to learn to knit because I'd love to make sweaters. I taught myself everything I know from the internet - and keep in mind, video websites and websites such as Ravelry were non-existent in 1995! I was lucky to keep an internet connection back then - and it took me forever to find a site that showed me how to purl, so it was garter for a (too) long time...

What sucked you in? Was it the color, the fiber, the community and friends?
Working with my hands and yarn and colors. It would be several years later before I stepped foot into my first local yarn shop (back then we had 2 that I knew of; we now have 9 in an hour and a half circumference!) and even later than that before I started knitting with "nice" and "expensive" yarns - and then even later still before I found a group I love to knit with at another local yarn shop!

Frances said...

Kristin, this book looks wonderful, and it also looks as if you have now got some fabulous young knitters in your extended family.

It was my very much beloved great auntie Mae that taught me to knit when it was very young. I am so happy to still be using her needles...particularly when double points are called for.

xo

mary kate said...

I learned to knit as a child but it didn't stick! I tried as an adult in a class full of children and remarkably my hands remembered what my head couldn't master as a child. I have never looked back.
Mary Kate
pwitry@rcn.com

Pbcreed said...

I started knitting when I was laid off from my job of 20 years. I think I started because it gave me a sense of control over something and I needed that, at that time. I immediately loved it! That was 2 years ago and I haven't stopped. By the way, this book looks beautiful!

Anonymous said...

I learned to knit when I was 7 so my reasons for doing so were limited - I think the process of taking string and making something seemed magical and it still does to this day
Knittingpessimist on ravelry

kamiller@epix.net said...

I'm past middle age and have been crocheting for quite awhile and I finally decided I was going to teach myself to knit. Knitting to me is so classy and refined. The end story is I've become obsessed. My iPad is running out of room filled with pattern after pattern. My house is overflowing with those "I can't pass up this sale" yarns. Hopefully I never lose my eyesight because I don't know what I'd do with it all.

Erin Berry said...

I started because I saw a hat wanted and the only way to get it was knit it myself. Ironically I never made the hat. I found too many other interesting things along the way.

Anonymous said...

Hi Kristin. My Mom was a crafter and started my sister and me out with cross stitch on gingham. She taught me to knit when I was 13 and we made matching cardigans. Pretty ambitious for 7th grade. Hers was pink and mine was navy to match my school uniform. Through high school, I knitted ski sweaters, scarves and mittens. When our babies started coming, my knitting changed to booties and bonnets. These days, I knit because it's a part of me and can't imagine a day without picking up the needles.
Cirilia's book is lovely. Thank you for the opportunity to win a copy.
Kathleen (KathNits on Rav)

Sheila said...

I taught myself to knit as a survival tactic my first dark and rainy winter after moving to Oregon. I didn't foresee how much of my life knitting, yarn and fiber would take over, or what a wonderful community I would find.

SheilaOKeefe on Rav

MicheleD said...

I took a knitting class from my best friend because my son wanted to learn to knit! We both learned some basics on a first project. I became hooked--it's so relaxing, and it is incredibly rewarding to finish a project and then be able to use it or wear it or give it away.

MicheleD said...

Oops! I will re-comment b/c I forgot to leave my ravelry ID. I learned the basics of knitting from a friend who taught me and my son; he was the original reason I tried it. I became quickly hooked! It's so relaxing! It's also very rewarding to finish and then be able to use a project!
NominativeKnitter on ravelry

Helen said...

My Mother taught me how to knit. I am guessing I learned because she knit and I was intrigued by the process. I think one of my first projects was a pair of orange and lime green striped socks. I guess it was the color. She also taught me to sew and embroider.

Becky said...

I am a reciever of knit gifts and I would give this book to a knitter I love!

Thanks

MelissaH said...

I learned to knit because I needed a way to generate nice hats in a hurry and for cheaper than I could buy them.

Teresa said...

My mom taught me to knit when I was three so that she could knit and not be distracted by me. I knit off and on as a child but started seriously knitting as I grew into a young lady. Now I am an old(er) lady and I still knit. I think knitting is a part of me.

Anonymous said...

~ I learned to knit by age seven, inspired by watching my Mom & my Aunt & my Nana, make all kinds of things by hand, sewing, knitting, crocheting, paper flowers and beaded embroidery.
Knitting was my favorite! I think it seemed the most magical to me. I liked taking it anywhere, knitting outside under the big lilac bushes at Nana's was special. I knitted for my trolls. I made up my own patterns all the time. I didn't learn pattern reading till after I had my son when I was 32.
I became a knitting teacher for after school programs for eight years, teaching more than 500 children to knit. I still have knitting students for private lessons in my home. Knitting resonates with my soul. The yarns have become so special, with alpaca, llama & sheep wool, bamboo, silk, such loVely hand-dyed yarns too! I enjoy buying yarn from small farms, using local wool or supporting those companies that use local farm fibers. Its wonderful to teach children about the animals the fiber comes from. Since I began teaching knitting at schools in 2000, there are so many creative knitting books that have been published & they still keep coming ~ .... that is magical.
Melanie Falick's books are indeed treasures !
Thank you for the great give-away Kristin. You always choose the gems of artists & writers to feature.
I loVe a book such as this, which includes story into the artist's life path.
Best,
Shell ~
YarnSoup@yahoo.com